The Creative World, and Transformative Experience of Anne Hughes’ Art by Wolfgang Krol

Anne Hughes' "Golden Circle" 44 x 30 soft pastel

Anne Hughes’ “Golden Circle” 44 x 30 soft pastel

When Marshal McLuhan coined the phrase “The medium is the message” little did he know that there was an artist in the making by the name of Anne Hughes who would dedicate her life and creativity to intuitively making the medium and the message come alive through her art. In a strange and uncanny way, Anne would become a benevolent messenger of an artistic “stargate” that opens the door to other worlds and experiences that connect us through creativity, imagination, reality, fantasy, dreams, play, curiosity, magic, hope, joy, and wonderment. Anne transmits all of this with humility, and dedicated commitment through her art, and through the intuitive ideas she explores through various physical materials with highly skillful artistic techniques, that inevitably takes the viewer through numerous, and multiple visual, conceptual, and transformative experiences in each and every work.

Anne Hughes "Natural Worlds" 43.5 x 29.75, soft pastel

Anne Hughes “Natural Worlds” 43.5 x 29.75, soft pastel

Many individuals are concerned, and to some degree, obsessed with definitions, and labels in art, related to realism, abstract, modern, post modern, etc. In the end all this labeling is nice for those who are more concerned with the history of art than with a timeless experience, communicating, interacting, and experiencing the art itself. If you are willing to forgo the labels, and are open to just experiencing the art, Anne will take you on a visual and emotional journey that will be remembered for a very long time. For those individuals who are fortunate enough to own one or more of Anne’s works, they will be able to experience this visual journey on a daily ongoing basis. The wonder of Anne’s magical creativity is that every time one engages with her work one experiences something new and enlightening. Just when we think we already know a work, we begin to see new relationships in the images, or gain new insights into her creative mind, or into our reality, and perception.

Anne Hughes "Reading Time" 12" x 12" oil on panel

Anne Hughes “Reading Time” 12″ x 12″ oil on panel

Anne’s work is about experiencing. Everyone who engages with her work, and imagery may see something similar, but will not experience things in the same way, because we are all different, and experience things uniquely. We may see playful images, images that seem to be out of place, out of time, or out of reality as we know it. We may see images that interact in a space that is foreign to their natural environment: like a “fish out of water”. Anne transforms the natural environment and brings all environments together into one space, or frame. This may be hard to imagine in reality, but Anne’s work transforms reality, takes us on an imaginary journey, and while we are on this journey she shows us a new reality, a new way of seeing with many surprises, and new answers to the visual and conceptual questions that we may have. Anne’s work is not about linear logic, it is about a multi dimensional experience that redefines logic, reality, space, perception, and allows us to engage in new questions, experiences, and perceive new “logics”.

Anne Hughes, "Dark Night" soft pastel

Anne Hughes, “Dark Night” soft pastel

To really experience Anne’s work, or other work, for that matter, it must be seen in its actual physical configuration, and not in a photo, or on a computer, iPad, or cell phone screen; the so-called new social media “art gallery”. The real actual size, media, materials, configuration etc., is what brings her art works to life. When we approach a work, we already start our experience, and engagement.

Detail of "The Golden Circle" by Anne Hughes

Detail of “The Golden Circle” by Anne Hughes

As we move closer, our experience, and perception start to change, transform through the interaction of the colors, images, materials, and what we personally bring to the work.

Detail of "The Golden Circle" by Anne Hughes

Detail of “The Golden Circle” by Anne Hughes

Then, when we stop in front of Anne’s work, and journey visually through all the materials and imagery, we begin to see and experience the magical tour that Anne is taking us on.

Detail of "The Golden Circle" by Anne Hughes

Detail of “The Golden Circle” by Anne Hughes

We, as the viewer, have to find the correct distance or position from the work so our personal experience can take place. Even moving to the right or left of her work changes what we see and experience. In some art works this happened by default. In Anne’s work the changes in perception is by design.

Detail of "The Golden Circle" by Anne Hughes

Detail of “The Golden Circle” by Anne Hughes

Looking at her work on a computer or other technical device, for that matter, will NEVER give the true impact or power of the work. The character of the materials used ie. paper, wood, canvas, cardboard etc., the colors added, the strokes of the brush, pencil, pastels, etc., interacting with each other, all bring the work to life, transforming the original material(s) into a new identity opening the mind of the viewer giving new insights into ones perception and reality.

Detail of "The Golden Circle" by Anne Hughes

Detail of “The Golden Circle” by Anne Hughes

The phrase “seeing is believing” is very true after seeing the creative work of Anne Hughes; believing takes on a new meaning. As with all art we have to approach it with an open mind. We have to leave our prejudices, and biases at home, as much as possible, and experience each work on it’s own terms and merit /relationship as if we were talking to, or engaged with the artist personally; and before we know it we have developed a new friendship that will last a lifetime.

"Wish List" by Anne Hughes

“Wish List” by Anne Hughes

Those that are fortunate to see Anne Hughes’ work will experience things, like they never have before. But it must be remembered like all relationships, it takes time, engagement, and nurturing. However, even if one does not have the time to develop a “real friendship” or relationship with Anne’s work, just simply passing in front of a work, one just begins to feel as if Anne is stretching out her hand in a welcoming, friendly gesture encouraging us to engage in the exhilarating experience with her art.

Anne Hughes' "Iceland Inspired" 11 3/8" x 11 3/8", soft pastel

Anne Hughes’ “Iceland Inspired” 11 3/8″ x 11 3/8″, soft pastel

So welcome all to the creative world, and transformative experience of the unique art of Anne Hughes, and be pleasantly surprised, and elated with the message transformed by the media; and for all the above, Anne Hughes deserves to be recognized and acknowledged in a category among the best, and most creative artists.

Wolfgang Krol, Associate Professor, Studio Arts (retired)

Concordia University, Montreal, Que., Canada

Fumiko Toda and Beverly Zawitkoski: Exhibitions of Individual Contemporary Painting

ZIA Gallery launches the new art season on Saturday, September 10th with two featured exhibitions by celebrated artists Fumiko Toda and Beverly Zawitkoski.

Fumiko Toda's "Mountain with Wings" and "Untitled"

Fumiko Toda’s “Mountain with Wings” and “Untitled”

 

Beverly Zawitkoski's (left to right) "Watery Haze," "Into the New," and "Now and Then"

Beverly Zawitkoski’s (left to right) “Watery Haze,” “Into the New,” and “Now and Then”

Fumiko Toda, based in New York, grew up in a rural area outside Kyoto, Japan where nature stirred her imagination.

Fumiko Toda's "Golden Path" 48" x 48" mixed media on panel

Fumiko Toda’s “Golden Path” 48″ x 48″ mixed media on panel

As she went on to study art both in Japan and New York, abstract and, often whimsical, imagery of the natural world entered her visual vocabulary and continues to animate her vibrant, joyful expression.

"Always" by Fumiko Toda, 56" x 56" mixed media on satin

“Always” by Fumiko Toda, 56″ x 56″ mixed media on satin

Toda loves to mix and explore different materials and techniques, stitching together elements of her etchings to fabric and paper on panel with her free handling of paint. This exhibition is certain to uplift.

"Planting Seeds" by Fumiko Toda, mixed media on canvas

“Planting Seeds” by Fumiko Toda, mixed media on canvas

Beverly Zawitkoski is based in Montreal, Québec where her BFA from Concordia University led to an award of a Commonwealth Scholarship at The Slade School of Fine Arts in London, UK. There she completed her post-graduate studies and was awarded the Leslye Hurry Prize.

Beverly Zawitkoski's (from left to right) "Through There" 8.75 x 8.75, Acrylic on Mylar and  "Reminiscent" 31.5 x 43.5, Acrylic on Mylar

Beverly Zawitkoski’s (from left to right) “Through There” 8.75 x 8.75, Acrylic on Mylar and “Reminiscent” 31.5 x 43.5, Acrylic on Mylar

Zawitkoski paints with a desire to reach emotional depth and touch a sublime, inexplicable essence. Her journey is intuitive being informed by how the layering of paint changes direction and leads the artist into unpredictable worlds.

"Watery Haze" 24 x 36, Acrylic on Mylar by Beverly Zawitkoski

“Watery Haze” 24 x 36, Acrylic on Mylar by Beverly Zawitkoski

Her abstractions do, in fact, suggest a land, place, figure or world where intangible nature reigns.

"Splendour" by Beverly Zawitkoski 31.5 x 44.5, acrylic on Mylar

“Splendour” by Beverly Zawitkoski 31.5 x 44.5, acrylic on Mylar

Zawitkoski’s works have the ability to speak to people on many levels. Such is, perhaps, their wide appeal. Admirers and new audiences will enjoy seeing the evolution of her bodies of work, as this new exhibition demonstrates, once again.

Fumiko Toda and Beverly Zawitkoski at ZIA Gallery, September 10 - October 8, 2016

Fumiko Toda and Beverly Zawitkoski at ZIA Gallery, September 10 – October 8, 2016

The exhibition opens Saturday, September 10th, 5 – 7 pm at ZIA Gallery, 548 Chestnut Street, Winnetka, IL 60093 All are welcome to attend. Fumiko Toda and Beverly Zawitkoski continues through October 8th, 2016. www.ZIAgallery.net

The Inventive Expression of Jacqueline Baerwald by Shannon Gallagher

Jacqueline Baerwald describes herself mostly as a painter, but her body of work encompasses a variety of genres, including mixed media, assemblage, and sculpture. Her current work combines painting, found objects, and poetry.

Jacqueline Baerwald's "Give Them Wings" Acrylic on Books

Jacqueline Baerwald’s “Give Them Wings” Acrylic on Books

The ‘My Melondy: Issues of Adolescence’ series is conceptual, featuring the recurring image of a young girl painted on stacks of found books. The books, which are entirely thrifted, found, or gifted from friends, are carefully curated and arranged so that the titles form a found poem, which ultimately becomes an integral part of the piece.

Jacqueline Baerwald's "What Little Girls Are Made Of" 48.5 x 48.5 x 3 Acrylic on Books

Jacqueline Baerwald’s “What Little Girls Are Made Of” 48.5 x 48.5 x 3 Acrylic on Books

The work explores the issues faced by young women today, including body image, abuse, and the effects of family dissolution. “The work isn’t based on my life as much as a handful of close girlfriends who experienced rather massive trauma in their lives. The darker paintings of the Melondy series, well… I can attach a name or several names to each one of them,” she explained.

"Now I Lay Me Down To Sleep" Acrylic on Books by Jacqueline Baerwald

“Now I Lay Me Down To Sleep” Acrylic on Books by Jacqueline Baerwald

“Melondy is this sort of cartoonish character I created. I started painting her in 2011, and for a long time, I really only associated her with the average teenage girl… I only personally related to her here and there,” she said. “It’s strange, because I used to feel very different from her, but now I’m realizing that she embodies a lot about myself.”

"All That Glitters" Acrylic on Books by Jacqueline Baerwald

“All That Glitters” Acrylic on Books by Jacqueline Baerwald

Baerwald has enjoyed seeing how viewers relate to the work. “The work reflects a lot of pain,” she said, “but also hope- the idea that this isn’t the end of it.” I don’t know how comfortable I am with the word ‘activist,’ but the work is meant to instigate some sort of change. I don’t want to tell the viewer what that change is, but instead inspire them; to start a thinking process in their minds. I want art to be beautiful and interesting in technique, but also to make me stop and think about life, other people’s lives, the impact I have, and what I can do to make this world a better place, even in my small sphere of influence. At the core, that is what I’m trying to do with the ‘Melondy’ series.”

"Rock, Paper..." Acrylic on Books by Jacqueline Baerwald

“Rock, Paper…” Acrylic on Books by Jacqueline Baerwald

Prior to this series, the artist had been painting in a more realistic manner. “I want children and young people to enjoy the work as much as adults. This is the first time I’d tried something more cartoon-like, more whimsical. It’s been an interesting detour to go down this road, and [the work] seems to resonate with a lot of people,” she said. “The concept and symbolism- the ideas that I am going to convey through the imagery come first.

"You Are My Sunshine" Acrylic on Books by Jacqueline Baerwald

“You Are My Sunshine” Acrylic on Books by Jacqueline Baerwald

The work uses this cute little character that people fall in love with to address issues that they don’t want to talk about. But she draws you in, and you want to love her, and you think about how she’s experiencing a lot of pain, and decide, ‘Let’s stop brushing this under the rug.’”

"Birds of a Feather" Acrylic on books by Jacqueline Baerwald

“Birds of a Feather” Acrylic on books by Jacqueline Baerwald

Baerwald has no shortage of concepts for new work. “I have a long log of ideas. If I had more time, I’d paint all of them. I do a lot of reading on all sorts of subjects, and I have a huge interest in the human condition. I end up reading a lot of things that have scientific or religious components to them, looking at different worldviews, various societal issues and mindsets. Ultimately,” she said, “my work distills more about what is going on in the active mind, how we can monitor our own thinking, and how our actions follow.”

"Sealed Lips" Acrylic on books by Jacqueline Baerwald

“Sealed Lips” Acrylic on books by Jacqueline Baerwald

Jacqueline Baerwald’s work currently can be seen at ZIA Gallery.

Paula Kovarik Stitches Content and Imagination by Shannon Gallagher

Paula Kovarik uses cloth and stitch to create art that reflects on life, politics, and the world around us.

"Punditocracy" by Paula Kovarik

“Punditocracy” by Paula Kovarik

Current events inform her work. “It’s hard to find good news,” she said.“I react to what I read.”Kovarik references maps, photographs and sketches when beginning new work. An eclectic mix of subject matter finds its way into her art. The environment looms large, as does social interaction and technology. She is currently working on a piece about nuclear testing. The seriousness of the subject matter is tinted by satirical expression and the playfulness of a child.

"Keeping Up with the Dow Joneses" by Paula Kovarik

“Keeping Up with the Dow Joneses” by Paula Kovarik

The juxtaposition of playfulness and seriousness in Kovarik’s work is intentional; it draws the viewer into the work. “Often people will come to [a piece] attracted to the playfulness, and then they look closer and see the message,” said Kovarik. “Some pieces are just an emotion or a mindset that I want to communicate through stitching. You must be close to view the details of the work. People are drawn to the piece and surprised by the content.”

"Decision Tree" by Paula Kovarik

“Decision Tree” by Paula Kovarik

Kovarik finds great fun in creating environments. “I like drawing fantastical spaces, letting the pen move and seeing what happens after it’s done.

"Meanwhile" by Paula Kovarik

“Meanwhile” by Paula Kovarik

I work the same way when I’m stitching. I watch the stitched line move through space, creating arrows, spirals, and snake-like shapes. It’s a personal challenge that I have worked with for quite awhile, allowing the stitch to have it’s own life, letting it flow. Then I react to that line with the next stitch; it’s a bit of a game.”

"Looking for Love in All the Wrong Places" by

“Looking for Love in All the Wrong Places” by Paula Kovarik

The incredible detail and intricacy of Kovarik’s work would be painstaking if done completely by hand.

Detail of Paula Kovarik's "Looking for Love in All the Wrong Places"

Detail of Paula Kovarik’s “Looking for Love in All the Wrong Places”

“I stitch with a free-motion foot on my sewing machine to draw with thread. That’s my primary focus. Hand stitching is more for adding texture.” She has some pieces that are completely hand stitched, which were done with an introspective mindset. “The practice of stitching through cloth in a private space is meditative, calming. It creates a stress free zone.”

"Silent Witnesses" by Paula Kovarik

“Silent Witnesses” by Paula Kovarik

"Global Warming, The Great Unraveling" by Paula Kovarik

“Global Warming, The Great Unraveling” by Paula Kovarik

Inspiration, too, can come from the fabric. “Sometimes it is stained, or ragged on the edges, or has a texture that appeals to me,” she said.  “Raw canvas is neutral and shows the stitch in a very clean way. I also collect antique linen and cotton fabrics. I’ve used commercial fabrics and even some pieces of clothing. Fabric has such an amazing quality, it gives and stretches and crimps, takes dye, takes stitches. I enjoy seeing how the fabric reacts to the thread. I experiment with different battings to achieve dimension.”

"Catalysts" by Paula Kovarik

“Catalysts” by Paula Kovarik

Kovarik, who spent over 25 years running a successful graphic design business, has always had an interest in making art, but didn’t always have the time. She did some painting and collage work, squeezing projects in when she could. “Towards the end [of my graphic design career], the fiber work started, and it became all-consuming. During the last few years, I was spending my evenings and weekends exploring this new medium.”

"Insomnia - Hers and His" by Paula Kovarik

“Insomnia – Hers and His” by Paula Kovarik

Kovarik’s training as a graphic designer influences her work. “There is a departure when I’m working,” she said. “Design helps me with composition, color and value, but it doesn’t contribute to the emotional or line quality of a piece. I have to let go of the structure that comes along with graphic design projects. It’s a different thought pattern.”

"Incoming" by Paula Kovarik

“Incoming” by Paula Kovarik

The artist admits that this manner of working requires a certain level of obsession. Because of her design career, this mindset was already a part of her creation process. “In design, every word has to be properly formatted, every detail measured. I’ve always had to be detail oriented,” she said. “I haven’t let go of that focus – it has served me well.”

"Round and Round It Goes" by Paula Kovarik

“Round and Round It Goes” by Paula Kovarik

Kovarik uses a variety of techniques to deal with the natural ebb and flow of creative energy. During slumps of inspiration, she becomes more contemplative. “I spend a lot of time reading. I have several projects in progress at any given time. So if I put one aside, I will return to it with fresh eyes, launching me back into the project.” She also spends time away from the studio. “Those times clear my mind and set me up for new bursts of creativity.”

"Beacons" by Paula Kovarik

“Beacons” by Paula Kovarik

The artist did not always have a strong interest in showing her work, until, in 2008, a friend urged her to enter a piece into Quilt National, one of the most prestigious juried competitions for fiber artists. “That changed a lot of things for me,” she explained. “I attended the show and watched people looking at and commenting on my work. I realized that art must move on, it’s not always just mine. Art needs to go in front of audiences to complete the passage.”

"Worry" by Paula Kovarik

“Worry” by Paula Kovarik

The Memphis-based artist got involved with ZIA after her work was shown at the Grand Rapids Art Museum at Art Prize 2015, one of the largest and most-attended public art events today. Accompanied now by an impressive list of exhibitions and awards, Kovarik’s artworks are out in the world garnering much respect and admiration, while being snapped up by collectors.

"Stream of Consequences" by Paula Kovarik

“Stream of Consequences” by Paula Kovarik

Paula Kovarik will have a solo exhibition along side Jacqueline Baerwald from June 25th to July 30th, 2016, with an opening reception on June 25th from 5-7pm at ZIA Gallery.

"Going Viral" by Paula Kovarik

“Going Viral” by Paula Kovarik

 

Photographer Kimberly Schneider’s Haunting Depictions of Nature by Shannon Gallagher

New York City-based photographer Kimberly Schneider’s abstract landscapes are haunting depictions of nature left untouched by man. The desolate land and seascapes, frequently shot with infrared film, somehow transplant complex feelings of peace, stillness, melancholy, and the endurance of time into the viewer’s mind.

"Undercurrent" by Kimberly Schneider

“Undercurrent” by Kimberly Schneider

The work, for Schneider, is essentially a form of self-portraiture. She immerses herself in the environments she aims to document and employs meticulous hours in the darkroom perfecting the images. The artist connects deeply with Point Lobos State Natural Reserve and the coastal California town of Carmel, (where famed photographer Edward Weston lived and worked), and feels compelled to create as a result of her time there.

"Wave Study" by Kimberly Schneider

“Wave Study” by Kimberly Schneider

“I haven’t connected to anything the way I have with Carmel,” she said. “Since my first photography class, before I even knew that I was a landscape photographer, the plan was always to go to Carmel and make work. It all began when I took a trip to San Francisco. A friend of mine hooked me up with a stay in the Weston cabin, which was completely unexpected, and turned out to be everything I could possibly dream of. I had seen the cabin in photographs; and when I got there, I watched my dreams come to life. I just felt that I was always meant to shoot there,” she said.

"Point Lobos" by Kimberly Schneider

“Point Lobos” by Kimberly Schneider

Schneider went on to explain that much of the work is instinctual, and she tends to discover the subconscious aspects of her art while developing the images in her studio. “I shoot what I’m inspired by, but I’m not overthinking it.” When she begins to print the images, she discovers that the level of connectivity to her own life is obvious. “As I work, I realize how tied I am to my photos; there is no separation between my work and my life,” she said. “It’s sort of a zen thing. I just go with it.”

"Memory 2" by Kimberly Schneider

“Memory 2” by Kimberly Schneider

Living in New York provides the network necessary to pursue art as a career, but leaves Schneider longing for a place to escape the hurried nature of the city. “The goal is to be bi-coastal,” she said. “I’ve lived in California. I can’t be there full time, I need a big city… but I want to shoot in California. I have Pacific withdrawal right now,” she went on.

"Entanglement" by Kimberly Schneider

“Entanglement” by Kimberly Schneider

When she needs to get away from the city, but doesn’t have time to get to the West coast, Schneider visits the Brooklyn Botanical Garden, or takes the train to the Upper East Side. “I have a friend that lives by the edge of the water. There’s a walking bridge right on the water, and I’ll shoot and have fun, but I don’t take it as seriously, and I don’t often wind up printing the images. It doesn’t compare to California. I love the eroded feel of the rocks and terrain out West. It’s been a long time since I’ve been highly inspired locally. I cannot have a camera in my hand and not shoot, but in order to invest in printing something, I must feel connected to it,” she said.

Installation view of exhibition at ZIA Gallery

Installation view of exhibition at ZIA Gallery

The artist works from a custom-built, fully functional home darkroom that fits five 16×20 steel trays. “I live in New York, so it’s a very tight space. It can be challenging at times, but it works… and it’s necessary to have it at home,” she said. To get in the flow of creation, Schneider listens to loud music while working, including blues and jazz. “I’ve been listening to a lot of Judith Hill,” she continued. “I discovered her by accident, but she makes awesome printing music.”

"Whisper" by Kimberly Schneider

“Whisper” by Kimberly Schneider



As for what Schneider has planned for the future, her goals are to stay productive, continue making work, and to go back to California with a large format 4×5 camera. A photographer friend of Schneider’s gifted her a Graflex Crown Graphic that had been converted to a field camera, which she plans to use it on her next trip out West. “I’m not sure if it’ll be the end-all-be-all, because eventually I will want to use lenses that are too heavy for it, but I’m planning on making some new work with that,” she explained excitedly. “The more I print this work, the more I realize that it’s time to go large format. The next phase of this series needs the amount of detail that only a large format negative can provide. I am preparing to return to California to start the third phase of my ongoing body of work, which I hope will be the strongest I’ve made thus far,” she said.

Kimberly Schneider and some of her infrared photography

Kimberly Schneider and some of her infrared photography

Kimberly Schneider and Clyde Butcher are currently exhibiting at ZIA Gallery through June 18th, 2016. The gallery is open Tuesday – Saturday, 10 – 5 pm and by appointment.

In the Midst of January, Art Transports

Now that the holiday season is over, come enjoy an afternoon of art and refreshments on Saturday, January 16, 1-5pm at ZIA Gallery. Allow yourself to be sensually, emotionally and intellectually transported.

A variety of ever-changing art at ZIA Gallery.

A variety of ever-changing art at ZIA Gallery.

2016 begins with an ever-changing exhibition including works by all 25 gallery and thirteen invited artists of varying disciplines and styles.

"Shoreline" is one of Beverly Zawitkoski's new acrylic paintings on mylar.

“Shoreline” is one of Beverly Zawitkoski’s new acrylic paintings on mylar.

New paintings by Beverly Zawitkoski and photographs by John Vlahakis have been added.

John Vlahakis' "Night Noir" is one of his latest photographs.

John Vlahakis’ “Night Noir” is one of his latest photographs.

Lisa A. Frank's "These I Sing In Spring," digital photography

Lisa A. Frank’s “These I Sing In Spring,” digital photography

As admirers carry away artworks, more works arrive, ready to be discovered.  A stunning garden of delight by Lisa A. Frank goes out the door and an equally intriguing photograph comes on view.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Many visitors will be disappointed that one Mary Burke they were considering has found its home.

Mary Burke's 48" x 48"  "Uplift" on right. Original works on paper on left.

Mary Burke’s 48″ x 48″ “Uplift” on right. Original works on paper on left.

Therefore, take note, follow through with the others being circled before those, too, are gone.

The remarkable Tim Liddy who is busy with a steady stream of important commissions, has left us three power-works of trompe l’oeil, sculptural painting.

"circa 1966" is one of Tim Liddy's trompe l'oeil paintings on formed copper.

“circa 1966” is one of Tim Liddy’s trompe l’oeil paintings on formed copper.

His star continues to rise, and we congratulate him on his accomplishments.

Melissa Jay Craig’s tiny handmade paper and steel wire sculptures are disappearing fast.

Melissa Jay Craig's "Luminal (Stage Two)" miniature sculptures.

Melissa Jay Craig’s “Luminal (Stage Two)” miniature sculptures.

Their color and amusing forms stimulate the imagination, as do her other works inspired by cellular patterns of plant forms. Melissa’s (S) Edition made the best of 2015 top ten choices by My Modern Met. Instead of just seeing the work all over the online-world (the book-arts works have gone viral and re-blogged with commentary in many languages throughout the world), you can see them in actuality…remember that? Actual vs. virtual?  From plant to pulp to molded, cast and dyed sculptural form, these artworks are handmade by Melissa to go in a real space. Dare to make your space special with unique expression.

Top: Melissa Jay Craig's hand made paper forms based on cellular patterns of cut-through of stems. Below: Lisa A. Frank's stunning digital photograph "Feared Loved"

Top: Melissa Jay Craig’s hand made paper forms based on cellular patterns of cut-through of stems. Below: Lisa A. Frank’s stunning digital photograph “Feared Loved”

Master of diverse photographic processes, Ted Preuss continues to sensitively explore still life, nature and the female figure. New to the gallery is photographer Kimberly Schneider displaying intimate, romantic black and whites of nature. ZIA Gallery is pleased to announce that artist Michael Cutlip has decided to continue sharing some of his remarkable mixed media paintings and collage with the Chicago public while other works head to L.A. Jonathan Ricci has a variety of his colorful paintings, both large and small, on paper, stretched and un-stretched canvas, along with his distinctive ceramic birds. …And there are many other gallery artists’ works on display showing the eclectic processes and expressions embraced by the gallery and its artists.

Gallery artist Kathy Weaver with her gouache on paper.

Gallery artist Kathy Weaver with her gouache on paper.

The exhibition also includes thirteen invited artists.

Ceramicist: Jacqui Worden (Her bowls reflect a threesome: functional, beautiful and affordable.)

Earrings by Diana Ferguson and Ceramic Vase by Jacqui Worden.

Earrings by Diana Ferguson and Ceramic Vase by Jacqui Worden.

Chicago Fashion Designer: Alice Berry  (She’s back! And her lovely scarves and silk-screened shawls are just the ticket to spark up a winter’s day.)

Designer Alice Berry with her signature scarves and shawls.

Designer Alice Berry with her signature scarves and shawls.

Chicago muralist Anne Farley Gaines contributes an imaginative screen.

Two sided screen by Anne Farley Gaines. Opposite side not shown. See it in the gallery.

Two sided screen by Anne Farley Gaines. Opposite side not shown. See it in the gallery.

Expressionist painter Bill Klatte adds his personal flair.

Giclées by Mark McMahon (expressing city life and sports with high quality, signed reproductions.)

Jewelers: Diana Ferguson, Terry Ross, Amy Taylor and Lisa Williams -each with her own personal vision. Definitely, here is something special for every taste.

A variety of small works by Jeweler Amy Taylor, Ceramic bowls and vases by Jacqui Worden, original works on paper by Mary Burke, necklace by Diana Ferguson, Ceramic birds by Jonathan Ricci.

A variety of small works by Jeweler Amy Taylor, Ceramic bowls and vases by Jacqui Worden, original works on paper by Mary Burke, necklace by Diana Ferguson, Ceramic birds by Jonathan Ricci.

Muralist and Street Artist: Joseph “Sentrock” Perez (What a joy to meet this personable street artist with a touching and inspirational message. Don’t miss!)

Joseph Perez (Sentrock) 's work on paper "Peace Squad"

Joseph Perez (Sentrock) ‘s work on paper “Peace Squad”

Diane Rakocy in front of one of her paintings.

Diane Rakocy in front of one of her paintings.

Painter: Diane Rakocy (She brings her love of color and paint to put the vibrancy in Chicago.)

Photographer: Barry Cain captures the unexpected meeting of two lions and an enjoyment of the natural world.

Barry Cain with his photograph of lions. Ted Preuss' small figure photograph below.

Barry Cain with his photograph of lions. Ted Preuss’ small figure photograph below.

Printmaker: Michael Bond conjures mood and light through drypoint, aquatint and “etching.”

Michael Bond's "Rainy Day Michigan Ave" Drypoint and aquatint.

Michael Bond’s “Rainy Day Michigan Ave” Drypoint and aquatint.

So much to see and appreciate in this confluence of varied genres by talented artists. The exhibition is now in progress and runs through January 30th Tuesday – Saturday 10-5pm at ZIA Gallery, 548 Chestnut St. Winnetka, IL.

ZIA Gallery

ZIA Gallery

Lisa A. Frank: ‘One Long Conversation’

By Shannon Gallagher

© Lisa A. Frank Feared Loved 40x40 Digital Photography

© Lisa A. Frank, Feared Loved, Digital Photography

Lisa Frank, whose intricate, layered digital photo collages combine her passions for the environment, the outdoors, and photography, began her art career in a different vein. At the young age of 22, after completing her degree in Art Education at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, Frank moved to New York City and pursued a career as a working artist. First, she worked as a scenic painter for theater and opera, later moving on to more decorative, surface paintings for high-end restaurants and other hospitality venues, as well as wallpaper and textile design. “In 1988, there was a stock market crash. People started spending less money on decorative painting, which tends to be a luxury item. At that point, I saw the need to retrain myself, because digital imaging was quickly overtaking the need for hand-rendered design,” she said. Frank attended the School of Visual Arts in NYC and took courses in Photoshop. She bought a camera and a scanner and taught herself how to use them.

© Lisa A. Frank Wildnight Digital Photography

© Lisa A. Frank, Wildnight, Digital Photography

“Everything I do basically comes down to drawing and painting,” she said, “but throughout the decades, the context and scale have changed. Technology has changed; my interests have changed, as has what I am physically able to do. Working in theater is very physically demanding. If I was doing that now, I’d be able to do nothing else.” She described her evolution as an artist as “one long conversation.”

© Lisa A. Frank Specimen with Eucalyptus Turtle Shell Honeycomb Digital Photograph

© Lisa A. Frank, Specimen with Eucalyptus Turtle Shell Honeycomb, Digital Photography

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Upon the completion of her undergraduate degree, Frank moved to NYC for an internship at Juilliard followed by graduate school at the Yale School of Drama . “I stayed on the east coast for 25 years, and then decided that I wanted to be closer to my family. I have nieces and nephews that I really love. My sister’s family is here [in Madison], as are my parents. My brother’s family is in Chicago.”

© Lisa A. Frank Mushroom Diorama Digital Photography

© Lisa A. Frank, Mushroom Diorama, Digital Photography

In terms of how she began to work photographically, Frank adopted a German Shorthair Pointer puppy 14 years ago. “He had a tremendous reserve of energy, and in order to live with him, I had to spend a lot of time outdoors. It is fun because I love the outdoors which is good for both of us. He has been a very patient photographer’s companion,” she said. Although spring and fall are her favorite times of the year, she takes photos in the woods during all four seasons. Several of her works feature patterns comprised of images of icicles. “I don’t go out when it’s below 10 degrees,” she said, “but all other times, I go out with my dogs. I don’t stop taking photos.”

© Lisa A. Frank Spiderwort and Prairie Smoke Digital Photography

© Lisa A. Frank, Spiderwort and Prairie Smoke, Digital Photography

The artist, who spends countless hours exploring nature and taking photographs, visits several places for inspiration. “In Wisconsin, there’s a national trail that has similar status as the Appalachian and Pacific Crest Trails. Segments of the trails are nearby, and I go there regularly. The Nature Conservancy owns some truly wonderful wilderness areas within an hour from Madison. I also go to an arboretum and conservation park close to my home.” The artist listed Olbrich Botanical Gardens as another favorite spot. “Wherever I go, I take my camera as a course of habit. Lately, I’ve also been going to a lot of zoos, because I’m beginning to use more animals in my work.”

Lisa A. Frank These I Sing In Spring Digital Photography

© Lisa A. Frank, These I Sing In Spring, Digital Photography

When asked to describe what she finds frustrating about the artistic process, Frank listed technical problems. “It mostly has to do with printing, color management and having enough memory space for the work that I do. My work is very layered, complicated, and large, so in order to do versions, which I do, it takes up an incredible amount of memory. I’m always up against this task to create enough space for it, backing everything up, and protecting myself adequately,” she said. Frank also has an archive of over 30,000 photographs which can be difficult to organize. “The taking of the photos and the actual making of the work is something that I love and it feels like a truly authentic part of me,” she said. “Organization and getting it to the point of putting it out in the world is where it can get problematic.”

 

Conversely, the most rewarding part of the artistic process for Frank is when people tell her something in her work resonates with them. “Also, I love being able to bring attention to things that many people cannot or do not see.” For instance, Frank often finds herself in the woods, closely examining the environment. “I take photos of mushrooms, moss, and rocks,” she said. “Not everyone is able to go out and explore like that, so I am very happy that I can use those objects as subject matter and show people that they exist.”

© Lisa A. Frank Jack-In-the-Pulpit Berries with Bolete Digital Photography

© Lisa A. Frank, Jack-In-the-Pulpit Berries with Bolete, Digital Photography

Last summer, Frank was accepted to and attended a prestigious residency at the MacDowell Colony, located in New Hampshire. The residency is over 100 years old, and has been host to some very successful artists, writers, musicians, filmmakers, and architects. “It was intimidating to be on the same property as some of these people,” she admitted. Frank went there with the intention of working on a specific project that she proposed during the application process. “I had a wonderful studio in the woods,” she said. “I worked and hiked and took a lot of pictures.”

© Lisa A. Frank Farmers Market Madison WI Digital Photography

© Lisa A. Frank, Farmer’s Market Madison WI, Digital Photography

There were about 25 people in residency – writers, architects, artists, etc. We had communal dinners after which everyone took turns giving presentations.” The goal of the residency is to give creative people an opportunity to work on their projects in a way that is undisturbed. “It’s beautiful there, and the solitude is quietly enforced. At noon, they deliver picnic baskets so that you don’t have to take a break to find something to eat. It was wonderful, just an incredible opportunity,” she said. Frank also takes pride in having been an instructor at the Penland School of Craft in North Carolina. “In a similar kind of way, it was a wonderful chance to really focus on one thing,” she said.

© Lisa A. Frank In My True Love's Hands Digital Photography

© Lisa A. Frank, In My True Love’s Hands, Digital Photography

As far as future plans and projects go, Frank is working on several interdisciplinary projects that include virtual reality content. In addition, this summer she will be teaching a course about exploring nature through technology at Peters Valley in New Jersey.

Lisa Frank’s work is currently on exhibit at ZIA Gallery. See http://www.ziagallery.net/frank.html for more information.

The Evolution of Matthew Schofield

By Shannon Gallagher

Matthew Schofield’s work has been in a constant state of evolution throughout his career. The small-scale oil paintings he creates now are quite different from the large scale, psychological, figurative paintings he created in college. “When I was in school, I always wanted to paint from life,” he said. “It was generally taught that painting from photos was taboo, and I agreed with that concept.” However, he later stumbled across some photo albums that belonged to his grandmother, and found himself enamored by the grouping and point of view of these images.

"Organ Sale Booth" 4" x 4" Oil on Mylar on Panel by Matthew Schofield

“Organ Sale Booth” 4″ x 4″ Oil on Mylar on Panel by Matthew Schofield

“I found the placement of the photos in the book interesting. It told a larger story, even though it wasn’t meant to. You viewed them together, and it gave you a richer tapestry of the narrative, where the photographer’s interests lie,” Schofield said. When he found the book, he began to paint in a more abstract way, focusing on the spaces between the people in the images, the space between the photos, and the human touch. “It was an area of interest to me, because it mean someone held it and placed it there. Is it haphazard, crooked, or placed with reverence? How does it frame the whole painting?”

"Canadian Couple" 5" x 5" Oil on Mylar on Panel by Matthew Schofield

“Canadian Couple” 5″ x 5″ Oil on Mylar on Panel by Matthew Schofield

Schofield found himself intrigued by the idea of gesture, the physical act of someone scrapbooking family photos. It was then that he began to paint small, because he started to work wet into wet, and had only a short time frame to complete each work. In 2006, he completed a series about the evolution of our time being managed, called (almost) everything, in which the artist focused on the things we think about or see when we’re distracted, or waiting in line, or what we see when we acquire our first smart phone- the constant bombardment of information and images that occurs in our daily lives. “I did a strip of small paintings that wrapped completely around the gallery. The images didn’t really relate, so I was essentially scrapbooking, doing the thing that I found interesting before. I really liked working small, and I liked the idea of the scrapbook, and so I started to look at who was holding the camera and used that as a portrait,” he explained.

"Red Car" 4" x 4" Oil on Mylar on Panel by Matthew Schofield

“Red Car” 4″ x 4″ Oil on Mylar on Panel by Matthew Schofield

Schofield then started to look at photographs taken by his grandmother and his father and began to examine what their interests were when taking the photo. “It showed their idiosyncrasies, what was important to them. I learned what they found worthy of a snapshot. It was naive and refreshing, because it wasn’t a contrived composition.” He also noted that the one to one scale is not meant to fool the viewer, but simply to reference the original object.

"Concrete Deck" 4" x 4" Oil on Mylar on Panel by Matthew Schofield

“Concrete Deck” 4″ x 4″ Oil on Mylar on Panel by Matthew Schofield

Although his grandmother is no longer living, Schofield’s parents have come to his exhibitions and given him further insight into what was going on in the photographer’s mind when various photos were taken. “I like that I get to talk to them about the imagery. I could see my dad starting to think about how he composed a shot. My mom told him that she didn’t like the way he took photos because he’d step back and take the full frame; she wanted to see the personality of the people in the images,” he recalled. “This meant that I was on the right track, as far as exposing the idiosyncrasies, the portraiture of the person taking the photo. They are the masters of the world you’re being exposed to.”

"Casting a Long Shadow" 4" x 4" Oil on Mylar on Panel by Matthew Schofield

“Casting a Long Shadow” 4″ x 4″ Oil on Mylar on Panel by Matthew Schofield

Schofield loves the curatorial aspect of his work. “The painting is enjoyable, but the installation is my favorite thing. I get great satisfaction from it, the challenge of concept to completion. Maturing as an artist, knowing why you’re doing what you are, and thinking of the next step, and what you want to accomplish with this. What’s my end game? How can I expand on this? These are thoughts that run through my head. Some artists can focus on something forever, but it doesn’t seem like much change, they’re very gradual. Sometimes, it’s a matter of a reaction to looking at older work, and in those moments, you can discover something that interests you, and chase after it. Now I’m at the refining stage, I want to go bigger now (in terms of installation), but it can’t be forced, because then it becomes contrived,” he revealed.

"Summer Vacation" diptych 6" x 4" Oil on Mylar on Panel

“Summer Vacation” diptych 6″ x 4″ Oil on Mylar on Panel

"Summer Vacation" diptych 6" x 4" Oil on Mylar on Panel (part 2)

“Summer Vacation” diptych 6″ x 4″ Oil on Mylar on Panel

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In regard to his series Supernumeraries: repurposed, a collection of small (1” x 1.5”) oil paintings on glass, he, in a way, pays homage to visual effects matte painters at the end of the 19th century. Schofield also, is doing post-production in film, for which he has been nominated for both a Primetime Emmy award and an Oscar. However, what he does for that line of work is largely done on computers. Before the digital age, matte painters painted giant (as large as 4’ x 8’) works with oil on glass to create backdrops for movie scenes when building an actual set would take up too much time, money, and materials. Many films, including Star Wars, were filmed this way. “It was crazy,” he said. “It’s more amazing what these artists did as individuals back then than what an entire studio can do today.” Schofield found himself thinking about what it would be like to paint on glass, and decided to give it a shot. “I was happy to try it, and I needed a reason to do it. I thought I was getting too tight as a painter, so I tried a different medium and scale.

"Supernumenaries 04" 1.5" x 1" Oil on Glass

“Supernumenaries 04″ 1.5″ x 1” Oil on Glass

Glass is slippery and slick; it was difficult at first. It was also a challenge to paint that small. I decided that I was going to work at that size because I was taking found photographs and finding the characters in the backgrounds of paintings and making them the primary characters- it’s a matter of importance, not scale. I focus on them instead of the person smiling. The series is called Sumpernumeraries, because that’s what background characters on set are called. This series loosened me up, and I might continue doing it on a larger scale,” he said.

Matthew Schofield's "Supernumeraries 08" 1.5" x 1" Oil on Glass

Matthew Schofield’s “Supernumeraries 08″ 1.5″ x 1” Oil on Glass

In the series, many of the images feature dark color palettes, which have nothing to do with the idea of looking at a slide without a projector. “It’s just that the photos I’m using are dark because they weren’t metered to the background. I try to paint verbatim, one to one. I like a technical challenge, like, ‘Can I paint this in the exact same color space?’ Sometimes it’s too dark, overexposed. That’s where I’m clearly referencing the original object,” he explained.

"Dinosaur" 4" x 6" Oil on Mylar on Panel by Matthew Schofield

“Dinosaur” 4″ x 6″ Oil on Mylar on Panel by Matthew Schofield

Schofield spent the bulk of last year working on 80 pieces for a major show at an art gallery in Ontario, so he’s happy to have a bit of a break right now. “After some time off, I’m going to try to conceive something for next year, to fill a bigger space,” he said. “It’s a tall order, and I’m happy to have the freedom and luxury of not having to think about it for a little while. After a major series, I need time for introspection, to let things percolate. I don’t want to water [the work] down.”

Matthew Schofield with some of his artwork at his opening reception at ZIA|Gallery.

Matthew Schofield with some of his artwork at his opening reception at ZIA|Gallery.

As far as the direction in which his work may be headed, Schofield said that he is thinking of working on a larger scale, in terms of installation. “When you have 80 small works, it becomes its own composition,” he said. “Each viewer picks different pieces to zoom in on; you can’t focus on a single image. It’s overwhelming, and it’s hard to choose something to look at. I’m building on the same theme of distraction.”

View to demonstrate scale of Matthew Schofield's "Canadian Couple"

View to demonstrate scale of Matthew Schofield’s “Canadian Couple”

Matthew Schofield’s work is on display at ZIA Gallery from March 7th through April 18th, 2015.

Resonance and Sustenance

What mysterious melding of components lead to resonance in art?

McDonald  -  Lake Flaccid 14x17-Mixed-Media.

McDonald – Lake Flaccid 14×17-Mixed-Media.

In the case of one of Brian McDonald’s artworks “Lake Flaccid,” it is his playful blend of symbols and words: a Christmas tree, the cartoon imagery of two sporty characters, a wounded arm, a sweet heart imprinted on a chest, a limousine filled with “friends,” along with the word “Dave” and the letter “C.” The chance encounter of these details with the life experience of a particular individual conspired to attain quixotic transcendence no artist could foresee. Still it happened, and the perfect work landed in the hands of the perfect recipient!?  In another example, it is an Icelandic horse’s magnetic gaze caught in the photographer’s pristine composition that speaks to viewers. Original prints of John Vlahakis’ “Bylgia” so quickly found homes, only one remains, waiting for its destination.

Vlahakis - Bylgia 20x30 archival photograph.  Edition of 5

Vlahakis – Bylgia 20×30 archival photograph. Edition of 5

During the process of juggling an infinite amount of choices to arrive at some unforeseen cohesion, an artist can slip into a form of meditation – as can the viewer when pulled into an intellectual and spiritual journey.  As the year enters its festive period, experience the wonders of art with an exhibition of such range and diversity, there is much to enjoy and to discover in contributions by more than thirty gallery and invited artists from disciplines including sculpture, painting, photography, drawing, jewelry, printmaking and beyond.

Sustenance abounds!

11-2014 Group Exhibition Postcard

Works pictured are by:

Karina Hean, Tim Liddy, Melissa Jay Craig, Brian McDonald

 

Zoriah Miller, Roland Kulla, Bob Krist, Richard Laurent

 

Kathy Weaver, Jonathan Ricci, Mary Burke, Lisa Frank, Michael Cutlip

 

Carl Wilen, Beverly Zawitkoski, Clyde Butcher, Anne Hughes, Rick Dula

 

 

Ted Preuss, Fumiko Toda, John Vlahakis, Matthew Schofield, Bob Rehak

And

Specially invited guest artists include:

Michael Bond, Barry Cain, Vicki Cook, Diane Ferguson

Mark McMahon, Corinne Peterson, Amy Taylor, Lisa Williams

The Year End Group Exhibition open Saturday, November 22nd, 5 -7pm at ZIA Gallery and continues through January 10th, 2015. In December the gallery will be open Sundays until the 25th. Check www.ZIAgallery.net for complete holiday hours.

ZIA Supports McCausland Scholarship

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Andrew and Sandy McCausland, Sarah’s parents, visited the gallery along with Sarah’s dear friend Maxine

JV019Phantom20x30

John Vlahakis – Phantoms

Efforts to support the McCausland family in their aim to raise both awareness and funds for the annual Sarah McCausland Scholarship continue. More magnets of Iceland are again at ZIA Gallery, ready for distribution. One of John Vlahakis’s photographs of Icelandic horses sold, and his donation to the scholarship fund has been made. Three photographs are currently left in the edition. The horses entitled “Phantoms” continue to attract admirers, as does the rest of the display.

Fellow Iceland Inspired artist Jonathan Ricci is once again spending July at the artists’ residency in Skagaströnd making new paintings. More of his ceramic birds will be revealed this Friday and Saturday during Winnetka’s summer community sidewalk sale.

Ricci Cold Heat Midnight Rainbow 12x9 Acrylic and Mixed Media copy

Tonight Andrew and Sandy McCausland, Sarah’s parents, visited the gallery along with Sarah’s dear friend Maxine. We talked of Sarah, Iceland, and the upcoming trip to that beautiful country which was a source of much curiosity and inspiration to Sarah. The family’s visit to Iceland no doubt will be bittersweet, but our thoughts are with them along with hopes for a beautiful and rewarding journey.

To learn more about Sarah McCausland and how ZIA Gallery became involved with the family and their endeavours, please read the following article written about six weeks ago:

Sometimes the confluence of events brings a community together in unexpected ways. This is the case with ZIA Gallery’s recent exhibition Iceland Inspired and the untimely death of a much-loved, young woman.  Enthusiastic Bard College student and New Trier High School graduate Sarah McCausland embraced all things Icelandic. She took it upon herself to study the language in anticipation of visiting Iceland this summer. Tragically, only a few months ago, she and a friend lost their lives when hit by a drunk driver.   During the exhibition of Iceland Inspired, members of the Winnetka community approached ZIA Gallery and told us about Sarah, her family, and the desire and need of the community to share the story of Sarah and her fascination with Iceland. Provided by the family, a small display in the gallery window honors Sarah. Now a new display is underway to further honor Sarah and encourage support of her family in their newly established scholarship: The Sarah C. McCausland New Trier Performing Arts Scholarship awarded through New Trier High School.

On Thursday, June 5th, 2014, the first annual scholarship was awarded. 

As soon as Iceland Inspired artist John Vlahakis learned of the scholarship, he offered to donate to the fund 20% from the sale of the remaining available prints in the edition of his Icelandic horses photograph “Phantoms,” pictured above. John shares a fascination with Iceland and its natural features. These Icelandic horses are tough, sturdy, friendly animals unique to the island and protected by their country.  As word spread of the pending scholarship plans, other of the artists equally wanted to participate.  Jonathan Ricci spent 2 months last summer in Skagaströnd, Iceland painting his joyful, colorful abstractions he aptly refers to as COLD HEAT: Painting under the Midnight Sun.  In addition, his “Migration Project” of ceramic birds continues to grow and move through the Winnetka community, and around the world. He left ceramic birds in nooks and crannies of the landscape in Skagaströnd as a thank-you to the people of the town for hosting the residency. Now Jonathan requests to donate 20% to Sarah’s scholarship fund from the sale of his painting “Midnight Rainbow” pictured above. This summer Jonathan returns to Iceland for the month of July, again to paint and be inspired by this remarkable country.

Anne Hughes spent a refreshing 9 days in Iceland and returned with photos she calls “research materials” to be used toward the development of a body of work. “Variations,” pictured above, is one pastel inspired by the geological features of Iceland. Through directly meeting several of Sarah’s warm family members, Anne has been touched to learn about Sarah.

Anne Hughes - Variations

Anne Hughes – Variations

Sarah’s parents and sister will fulfill Sarah’s dream through traveling together to Iceland this summer, as intended. In addition, their determination and strength will bring good to a deserving student of New Trier High School through the Sarah C. McCausland New Trier Performing Arts Scholarship.

Donations to the scholarship fund may be sent directly to the high school, payable to:

New Trier High School

Add Sarah McCausland‘s name written in the memo portion of the cheque.

The address is:

385 Winnetka Ave.

Winnetka, IL 60093

Here is what Sarah’s family says about the scholarship:

Sarah C. McCausland New Trier Performing Arts Scholarship

 

$750 Annually

 

The Sarah C. McCausland New Trier Scholarship for the Performing Arts is a scholarship of which students apply and faculty selects a finalist. Eligible students are those who have participated in two, preferably three of the following arts departments: orchestra, choral, and theatre. The student should have a financial need and exhibit the following qualities:

 

1. Charismatic leadership

 

2. Individuality of character

 

3. Kind support of fellow arts students

 

4. Standards of excellence 

 

Sarah loved New Trier’s performing arts. Her scholarship affirms her singular personality, her quest for learning and her passion for life and friends.

 

ZIA Gallery is pleased to participate in this worthy cause. We extend our support and sincere wishes toward a successful campaign to fulfill the McCausland family’s goals in creating a positive legacy in their daughter and sister’s name: Sarah McCausland.