Not What You Expect

The Floral Show (not what you expect) now at ZIA Gallery

The Floral Show (not what you expect) now at ZIA Gallery

The exhibition “The Floral Show (not what you expect)” is in full swing at ZIA Gallery, bringing together artists of such talents and imagination evoking the wonder of our natural world. This exhibition follows “The Elephant in the Room” which centered on elephants in art. Now artists soar toward spring with uplifting color and invention derived from inspiration of flowering plants.

Kevin Veara's Whip-poor-wills and Mary Burke's Natural Cycles - color, movement and change

Kevin Veara’s Whip-poor-wills and Mary Burke’s Natural Cycles – color, movement and change

The late scientist and essayist Loren Eiseley revitalizes appreciation through his essay “How Flowers Changed the World.” The journey of flowering plants resulted, no less, in the emergence of us. Angiospems have developed such remarkable diversity of form, color and mechanisms to travel. Yet, we still have much to discover, learn, and to rouse our curiosity.

The exhibition begins "The Floral Show (not what you expect)"

The exhibition begins “The Floral Show (not what you expect)”

Visual artists, too, through flourishing creativity, re-energize the words “floral show.” They are stimulated and fascinated both directly and indirectly, as can be seen through the unexpected universes of Mary Burke, Melissa Jay Craig, Lisa A. Frank, Karina Noel Hean, Anne Hughes, Ted Preuss, Jonathan Ricci, Fumiko Toda, John Vlahakis, Carl Wilen and invited artists Kevin Veara and Phil Ponce.

Phil Ponce takes papel picado techniques to the max with his gorgeous "Insectos."

Phil Ponce takes papel picado techniques to the max with his gorgeous “Insectos.”

The exhibition includes beautifully executed artwork by guest artist Phil Ponce (host of WTTW’s Chicago Tonight) who takes inspiration from the traditional Mexican folk art technique of papel picado. To create his interconnected labyrinths of nature, Phil replaces tissue paper with durable black tyvek and represents insects native to Illinois – an ecosystem of plants and insects.

Kevin Veara's "Northern Flicker" surrounded by "unknown climbing asters"

Kevin Veara’s “Northern Flicker” surrounded by “unknown climbing asters”

Kevin Veara’s visual ecosystem combines unusually patterned birds, flowers and insects in striking scale and color combinations. Melissa Jay Craig contributes her amazingly inventive handmade paper sculptural pieces, some inspired by looking at the lacy cellular patterns of a stem such as Bloodroot, others by seeds.

Melissa Jay Craig's "Protector" -only Melissa could create such a sculpture!

Melissa Jay Craig’s “Protector” -only Melissa could create such a sculpture!

There is always a twist (or two or three) in her thought-provoking pieces. Her installation of (S)edition, sculptural book/mushrooms, growing up the gallery wall projects a sense of humor with much to engage and challenge.

Melissa Jay Craig's (S)Edition to left of Toda's diptych

Melissa Jay Craig’s (S)Edition to left of Toda’s diptych

John Vlahakis' stunning "Blue Velvet"

John Vlahakis’ stunning “Blue Velvet”

John Vlahakis photograph “Blue Velvet” mesmerizes as it saturates the eye with blue and yellow.

Jonathan Ricci's "Botanical 1 : Spike and Alice"

Jonathan Ricci’s “Botanical 1 : Spike and Alice”

Through his fanciful “Botanical 1: Spike and Alice” New Jersey artist Jonathan Ricci makes reference to the excitement surrounding a Chicago Botanic Gardens’ phenomenon that turned into an amusing story.

Mary Burke's "Summer Day," 12 x 36, acrylic, ink and other on canvas

Mary Burke’s “Summer Day,” 12 x 36, acrylic, ink and other on canvas

Mary Burke’s paintings reveal her love of nature where blooms are often the only representational elements of her abstractions.

Lisa Frank's Frank In the Shadow of Butterflies 40 x 40.

Lisa Frank’s Frank In the Shadow of Butterflies 40 x 40.

Lisa A. Frank uses her skill at layering her digital photographs to create lush compositions, while Fumiko Toda dazzles with mixed-media paintings. She holds dear childhood explorations in nature, growing up in Japan.

Blue Sky II part of a diptych by Fumiko Toda, 48 x 30.

Blue Sky II part of a diptych by Fumiko Toda, 48 x 30.

Through choice of materials, color and expression, Fumiko’s paintings evoke that curiosity of a child on an adventure of discovery in the wide out of doors.

Ted Preuss prints using platinum palladium on vellum for his "Vase." More features to be seen!

Ted Preuss prints using platinum palladium on vellum for his “Vase.” More features to be seen!

Ted Preuss uses historic photographic techniques on subtle imagery with new methods of presentation.

Carl Wilen's Almoro Castle 12 x 14.75 Watercolor Ink Graphite Cut Paper

Carl Wilen’s Almoro Castle 12 x 14.75 Watercolor Ink Graphite Cut Paper

Carl Wilen has often mentioned the fascination of flowers which he enjoys finding reason to include in his detailed wry, surreal paintings.

Karina Hean, "Field Notes V," Mixed media on vellum, 11x17

Karina Hean, “Field Notes V,” Mixed media on vellum, 11×17

Karina Noel Hean grew up by the Chesapeake Bay taking inspiration from nature that she would later reference in sophisticated abstractions. Anne Hughes expresses wonder and mystery using soft pastel in an unconventional manner. Much to discover at this “Floral Show” and not what you expect!

Anne Hughes' "Migrations" 36 x 24 x 1, soft pastel on layered paper

Anne Hughes’ “Migrations” 36 x 24 x 1, soft pastel on layered paper

The Floral Show – not what you expect runs through April 7, 2018 at ZIA Gallery, 548 Chestnut St., Winnetka, IL.

Part 2: Back to Back Exhibitions… “The Floral Show – not what you expect”

The second exhibition to celebrate the wonders of our natural world is The Floral Show… not what you expect.

View of The Floral Show showing works by Fumiko Toda, Karina Hean, Melissa Jay Craig, Anne Hughes, Phil Ponce, Melissa Jay Craig and Carl Wilen

View of The Floral Show showing works by Fumiko Toda, Karina Hean, Melissa Jay Craig, Anne Hughes, Phil Ponce, Melissa Jay Craig and Carl Wilen

How can it be The Floral Show suggests something so seemingly common and staid, we no longer grasp the amazing transformation of a world that specifically resulted from the evolution of flowering plants?

Works by Phil Ponce, Melissa Jay Craig and Fumiko Toda

Works by Phil Ponce, Melissa Jay Craig and Fumiko Toda

The late scientist and essayist Loren Eiseley revitalizes appreciation through his essay “How Flowers Changed the World.”

View of works by Melissa Jay Craig, Karina Hean, and Jonathan Ricci in the exhibition "The Floral Show - not what you expect"

View of works by Melissa Jay Craig, Karina Hean, and Jonathan Ricci in the exhibition “The Floral Show – not what you expect”

The journey of flowering plants resulted, no less, in the emergence of us.

Kevin Veara's Exult 10, Whip-poor-will

Kevin Veara’s Exult 10, Whip-poor-will

Angiospems have developed such remarkable diversity of form, color and mechanisms to travel. We still have much to discover, learn, and to rouse our curiosity.

View of works by John Vlahakis, Jonathan Ricci, Lisa A. Frank and Anne Hughes.

View of works by John Vlahakis, Jonathan Ricci, Lisa A. Frank and Anne Hughes.

Visual artists, too, through flourishing creativity, re-energize the words “floral show.”

Mary Burke's triptych of paintings on shaped wood "Natural Cycles," allowing variations in placement.

Mary Burke’s triptych of paintings on shaped wood “Natural Cycles,” allowing variations in placement.

They are stimulated and fascinated both directly and indirectly, as can be seen through the unexpected universes of Mary Burke, Melissa Jay Craig, Lisa A. Frank, Karina Noel Hean, Anne Hughes, Ted Preuss, Jonathan Ricci, Fumiko Toda, John Vlahakis, Carl Wilen and invited artists Kevin Veara and Phil Ponce. The Floral Show – not what you expect runs through April 7, 2018 at ZIA Gallery, 548 Chestnut St., Winnetka, IL.

"The Floral Show" (not what you expect!) runs Saturday March 3 - Saturday, April 7, 2017.

“The Floral Show” (not what you expect!) runs Saturday March 3 – Saturday, April 7, 2017.

Fumiko Toda, Mary Burke, 

Jonathan Ricci, Melissa Jay Craig, Lisa A. Frank, 

Carl Wilen, John Vlahakis, 

Kevin Veara, Karina Hean, 

Ted Preuss, Anne Hughes and Phil Ponce

Part One: Back to back exhibitions… “The Elephant in the Room”

Back to back exhibitions at ZIA Gallery celebrate the wonder of our natural world.01-20-2018 Postcard copyfb

The exhibition “The Elephant in the Room” was conceived slowly over the past few years as ZIA Gallery began to notice a number of artists making reference to elephants in their works. One of the first artists was Mary Burke who subtly included a phrase along with a small sketch in her abstract painting “Natural Order.”

Mary Burke, Natural Order, 36x48, Acrylic Graphite on Canvas

Mary Burke, Natural Order, 36×48, Acrylic Graphite on Canvas

More elephants appeared in a number of Fumiko Toda’s paintings as part of the magic of her world.

Fumiko Toda, "Expectation" 47x 39 Mixed media on canvas

Fumiko Toda, “Expectation” 47x 39 Mixed media on canvas

Then a sequin elephant served as a formative element in a collage and mixed media miniature “Elephant Notes” by Anne Hughes.

Anne Hughes, "Elephant Notes" 5" x 5" pastel, sequin, acrylic, found object

Anne Hughes, “Elephant Notes” 5″ x 5″ pastel, sequin, acrylic, found object

Elephants are clearly on the minds of artists.

Anne Hughes, "Of the Garden" 5" x 5" soft pastel

Anne Hughes, “Of the Garden” 5″ x 5″ soft pastel

“The Elephant in the Room” opened January 20th with contributions by Brian McDonald, Preston Jackson, Jonathan Ricci, Bob Krist; in addition to more works by Mary Burke, Anne Hughes and Fumiko Toda.

Mary Burke, "Never Too Many" 21x21 Acrylic, crayon and other on paper

Mary Burke, “Never Too Many” 21×21 Acrylic, crayon and other on paper

In his “Box Office Beasts” Brian McDonald layers color and text referencing graffiti, pop and painterly abstraction while reflecting a thought-provoking, human-centric focus even as other animals are invoked. Brian peppers his work with often, overlooked details.

Brian McDonald, "Box Office Beasts" Mixed media painting and collage on paper 25" x 21"

Brian McDonald, “Box Office Beasts” Mixed media painting and collage on paper 25″ x 21″

As the exhibition neared, it came to ZIA’s attention that noted Chicago sculptor Preston Jackson also created passionate and wonderfully expressive paintings of elephants.

Preston Jackson, "African Profile" 36 x 48 Acrylic on Canvas

Preston Jackson, “African Profile” 36 x 48 Acrylic on Canvas

ZIA Gallery is pleased that Preston accepted the invitation to participate. His work contributes another direction of emotive, elephant-inspired artwork.

Preston Jackson's Say Goodbye, 60 x 48, Acrylic on canvas

Preston Jackson’s Say Goodbye, 60 x 48, Acrylic on canvas

Over the past number of years Jonathan Ricci has developed a colorful body of mixed media paintings with collaged elements cut from maps and dressmakers patterns. Often birds arise in his works adding to interpretations suggesting freedom, travel and exploration.

Jonathan Ricci, "Elephant and the Moon" 18 x 24 Acrylic and collage

Jonathan Ricci, “Elephant and the Moon” 18 x 24 Acrylic and collage

Rhythmic pattern and color combinations enhance the impulse to relish in spontaneity.

Jonathan Ricci, "Elephant Summit" 18" x 24" Acrylic and Collage on canvas

Jonathan Ricci, “Elephant Summit” 18″ x 24″ Acrylic and Collage on canvas

Jonathan’s expressive tendencies spill, with ease, into paintings where elephants seamlessly join the mix, appearing at once regal and playful, and always journeying on.

Jonathan Ricci, "Elephant C" 26 1/8 x 28, Acrylic and Collage

Jonathan Ricci, “Elephant C” 26 1/8 x 28, Acrylic and Collage

Bob Krist, "Elephant Terraces" 20 x 30 Infrared Photography

Bob Krist, “Elephant Terraces” 20 x 30 Infrared Photography

Through infrared photography Bob Krist captures a sense of mystery and a silent awe-inspiring curiosity surrounding stone remains of Elephant Terraces containing hints of detailed carvings crumbling over time and obscured by moss. In an area adjoining Angkor Wat, in Cambodia, the thousand-foot-long Elephant Terrace served as the base of Khmer king’s audience pavilions and reviewing stands.

Fascination for the elephant transcends time.

Anne Hughes "Elephant Dreams" Soft pastel, cut paper, acrylic, 26" x 28.5"

Anne Hughes “Elephant Dreams” Soft pastel, cut paper, acrylic, 26″ x 28.5″

While “The Elephant in the Room” is leaving, for now, a new exhibition arrives March 3, 2018: The Floral Show (not what you expect!). Invited artists Kevin Veara and Phil Ponce join ZIA Gallery artists.

Fumiko Toda "Meet Again" 30 x 22, etchings and chine collé

Fumiko Toda “Meet Again” 30 x 22, etchings and chine collé

More on this exhibition coming up in Part II. Meanwhile, ponder how it can be – that in this era, “The Floral Show” can suggest something so seemingly common and staid, we no longer grasp the amazing transformation of a world that specifically resulted from the evolution of flowering plants!? See you at The Floral Show, March 3 – April 7, 2018, Tuesday through Saturday, 10 – 5 PM and by appointment, ZIA Gallery, 548 Chestnut St., Winnetka, IL, 60093. The artworks will re-energize words, minds and spirits!

"The Floral Show" (not what you expect!) runs Saturday March 3 - Saturday, April 7, 2017.

“The Floral Show” (not what you expect!) runs Saturday March 3 – Saturday, April 7, 2018 at ZIA Gallery.

Complementary Exhibitions of Mary Burke’s new paintings and Clyde Butcher’s B+W Photography

Mary Burke with her paintings "Garden Shapes" and "Organic Rhythms"

Mary Burke with her paintings “Garden Shapes” and “Organic Rhythms”

The art season has begun with Art Expo and gallery openings. The latest event at ZIA Gallery introduces Mary Burke’s new paintings, fresh and vibrant abstractions with references to the physicality of paint and the endless rich variations of marks and gestures.

"Limestone Layer" by Mary Burke, 60 x 40 Acrylic

“Limestone Layer” by Mary Burke, 60 x 40 Acrylic

Mary says of her work, “Formally, my work manifests the play of design elements which are created through a combination of accidental and intentional marks. I love the paint to entertain me, and then I respond. I work expressively with line, intermingling non-figurative, gestural marks with those that reference plants and flowers.”

"Floral Deconstruct" by Mary Burke, Acrylic and Ink on Panel, 24 x 18

“Floral Deconstruct” by Mary Burke, Acrylic and Ink on Panel, 24 x 18

Inherent in her work is a fascination with nature’s complexities. She loves to experiment branching off with her painterly explorations in a variety of directions, expanding her vocabulary of forms and color.

"Mingled Patterns" 60 x 48, acrylic on canvas by Mary Burke

“Mingled Patterns” 60 x 48, acrylic on canvas by Mary Burke

At the core, however, is her recognizable self-expression. Chicago native Mary Burke now makes her studio in the woods of southwest Michigan.

Clyde Butcher at ZIA Gallery

Clyde Butcher on view at ZIA Gallery through October 7, 2017

The National Parks inform the complementary exhibition of black and white, mostly, silver gelatin photographs by renowned artist Clyde Butcher. The exhibition shows his passion for nature and the richness of the land.

Clyde Butcher's "Horseshoe Bend 3"

Clyde Butcher’s “Horseshoe Bend 3”

Clyde has captured the very essence of rewards offered by our unique park system. His images serve as ambassadors making the case on behalf of these landscapes themselves.

"Buffalo" by Clyde Butcher

“Buffalo” by Clyde Butcher

Fifty years in the making, this collection of sensitive photographs helps to celebrate our national heritage and the places that tell the story of who we are and who we hope to be in perpetuity.

"Foggy Forest 1" by Clyde Butcher

“Foggy Forest 1” by Clyde Butcher

Clyde has chosen to compile a remarkable body of black and white, mostly, silver gelatin prints to celebrate the 100th anniversary of our National Parks. ZIA Gallery is pleased to introduce to lovers of nature and fine photography of the Chicago area, this stunning tribute.

 "Many Glacier 1" by Clyde Butcher 22 x 22

“Many Glacier 1” by Clyde Butcher 22 x 22

At the time of the exhibition opening Clyde Butcher was hunkered down to stave off the forces of Hurricane Irma. Thankfully, all are well and cleanup is in progress. Over the years Clyde Butcher has become known for his efforts in bringing forth the wonders of the Everglades and the importance of their preservation.

Clyde Butcher's "Little Butternut Key" 37 x 51 Silver Gelatin

Clyde Butcher’s “Little Butternut Key” 37 x 51 Silver Gelatin

Award-winning filmmaker Ken Burns states, “Clyde Butcher’s remarkable photographs give us an access to nature we rarely see or experience. They not only reveal the intimate and majestic beauty of nature, but they also remind us of the abiding kinship we mortals share when we work together to preserve these magnificent places. Butcher’s art is a national treasure.”

Clyde Butcher's "Saguaro 1 Arizona" 26 x 30 Silver Gelatin

Clyde Butcher’s “Saguaro 1 Arizona” 26 x 30 Silver Gelatin

The exhibitions continue at ZIA Gallery through October 7th, 548 Chestnut St., Winnetka, IL 60093

www.ZIAgallery.net

Clyde Butcher's "HawaIi Falls"

Clyde Butcher’s “HawaIi Falls”

Tim Liddy and Lisa A. Frank: Solo Exhibitions to See

ZIA Gallery is currently presenting exhibitions featuring works by Tim Liddy and Lisa A. Frank.

Artist Tim Liddy in front of some of his works

Artist Tim Liddy in front of some of his works

A mini-retrospective of Tim Liddy’s paintings give viewers insights into directions he pursued in the process of developing a remarkable body of work. From large-scale pieces referencing art history, society, and myth,

Tim Liddy "Damocles" 53 x 48 Mixed Media on Paper graphite, latex, image transfer on paper

Tim Liddy “Damocles” 53 x 48 Mixed Media on Paper graphite, latex, image transfer on paper

Tim arrives at his dimensional paintings of games on formed metal that are garnering attention today.

Tim Liddy "Devil's Food" 18 x 12 x 1.5 enamel, silver leaf, pigment transfer on copper

Tim Liddy “Devil’s Food” 18 x 12 x 1.5 enamel, silver leaf, pigment transfer on copper

Tim Liddy "Angel Food" 18 x 12 x 1.5 enamel, silver leaf, pigment transfer on copper

Tim Liddy “Angel Food” 18 x 12 x 1.5 enamel, silver leaf, pigment transfer on copper

Tim Liddy "Circa 1966" Oil and Enamel on Copper 13 x 19

Tim Liddy “Circa 1966” Oil and Enamel on Copper 13 x 19

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“We’ve played games throughout the history of civilization, and play is a very important part of the human experience- whether you’re kicking a ball or engaging in more intellectual play.”

Fascination

Fascination

 

Lisa A. Frank "William Morris Overheard" 27 x 36 digital photography

Lisa A. Frank “William Morris Overheard” 27 x 36 digital photograph

Lisa A. Frank is a fine art photographer composing unique, lush images from collections of photographs of nature.

Lisa A. Frank with two of her original photographs

Lisa A. Frank with two of her original photographs

Camera ready, during walks in nature, Lisa photographs elements that help to make up the patterns and forms she digitally manipulates resulting in photographs full of romanticism and wonder. “The taking of the photos and the actual making of the work is something that I love and it feels like a truly authentic part of me.”

Lisa A. Frank "In Just Spring" 36.5 x 40 Edition of 15

Lisa A. Frank “In Just Spring” 36.5 x 40 Edition of 15

Lisa A. Frank and exhibition attendee

Lisa A. Frank and exhibition attendee

Both artists kindly traveled from a considerable distance to attend the opening reception.

Tim Liddy engages a father and daughter

Tim Liddy engages a father and daughter

Tim Liddy even came in early to meet with a father and daughter, spending more than an hour talking to them. How often does the public have a chance to meet such remarkably generous artists at their level of creative practice? Thank you.

Artist Tim Liddy greeting exhibition attendees

Artist Tim Liddy greeting exhibition attendees

Tim Liddy’s work has been exhibited at venues including Art Miami/Basel, Aqua Art Miami, Dallas Art Fair, Palm Springs Art Fair among others.

Tim Liddy "circa 1986" (Ferris) Oil and Enamel on copper 13 x 19 x 1 ½

Tim Liddy “circa 1986” (Ferris) Oil and Enamel on copper 13 x 19 x 1 ½

His works have been acquired for contemporary collections across the United States, including those of Beth DeWoody and Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art among many other private collections. As well, the Hunt family, owners of the Kansas City Chiefs, commissioned a number of Liddy’s works for the Arrowhead Stadium.

Work by Lisa A. Frank

Work by Lisa A. Frank

At the University of Wisconsin-Madison where she holds an MFA in Design Studies, Lisa A. Frank is currently part of the Discovery to Product (D2P) incubator program. With its support, she is developing virtual reality content that is based on her 2D photography.

Lisa A. Frank "Columbine-The Mystery of Five Doves" 40 x 37 digital photography

Lisa A. Frank “Columbine-The Mystery of Five Doves” 40 x 37 digital photography

Using her artwork to also enhance interdisciplinary explorations, Frank was chosen to be a Senior Research Fellow at the Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign. She was the first artist/collaborator to be given this distinction. Lisa was an Evelyn Stephansson Nef Fellow in photography at MacDowell Colony.

Tim Liddy's paintings on formed copper

Tim Liddy’s paintings on formed copper

The exhibition continues through June 10th at ZIA Gallery, 548 Chestnut St. Winnetka, IL 60093 tel. 847-446-3970.

The Creative World, and Transformative Experience of Anne Hughes’ Art by Wolfgang Krol

Anne Hughes' "Golden Circle" 44 x 30 soft pastel

Anne Hughes’ “Golden Circle” 44 x 30 soft pastel

When Marshal McLuhan coined the phrase “The medium is the message” little did he know that there was an artist in the making by the name of Anne Hughes who would dedicate her life and creativity to intuitively making the medium and the message come alive through her art. In a strange and uncanny way, Anne would become a benevolent messenger of an artistic “stargate” that opens the door to other worlds and experiences that connect us through creativity, imagination, reality, fantasy, dreams, play, curiosity, magic, hope, joy, and wonderment. Anne transmits all of this with humility, and dedicated commitment through her art, and through the intuitive ideas she explores through various physical materials with highly skillful artistic techniques, that inevitably takes the viewer through numerous, and multiple visual, conceptual, and transformative experiences in each and every work.

Anne Hughes "Natural Worlds" 43.5 x 29.75, soft pastel

Anne Hughes “Natural Worlds” 43.5 x 29.75, soft pastel

Many individuals are concerned, and to some degree, obsessed with definitions, and labels in art, related to realism, abstract, modern, post modern, etc. In the end all this labeling is nice for those who are more concerned with the history of art than with a timeless experience, communicating, interacting, and experiencing the art itself. If you are willing to forgo the labels, and are open to just experiencing the art, Anne will take you on a visual and emotional journey that will be remembered for a very long time. For those individuals who are fortunate enough to own one or more of Anne’s works, they will be able to experience this visual journey on a daily ongoing basis. The wonder of Anne’s magical creativity is that every time one engages with her work one experiences something new and enlightening. Just when we think we already know a work, we begin to see new relationships in the images, or gain new insights into her creative mind, or into our reality, and perception.

Anne Hughes "Reading Time" 12" x 12" oil on panel

Anne Hughes “Reading Time” 12″ x 12″ oil on panel

Anne’s work is about experiencing. Everyone who engages with her work, and imagery may see something similar, but will not experience things in the same way, because we are all different, and experience things uniquely. We may see playful images, images that seem to be out of place, out of time, or out of reality as we know it. We may see images that interact in a space that is foreign to their natural environment: like a “fish out of water”. Anne transforms the natural environment and brings all environments together into one space, or frame. This may be hard to imagine in reality, but Anne’s work transforms reality, takes us on an imaginary journey, and while we are on this journey she shows us a new reality, a new way of seeing with many surprises, and new answers to the visual and conceptual questions that we may have. Anne’s work is not about linear logic, it is about a multi dimensional experience that redefines logic, reality, space, perception, and allows us to engage in new questions, experiences, and perceive new “logics”.

Anne Hughes, "Dark Night" soft pastel

Anne Hughes, “Dark Night” soft pastel

To really experience Anne’s work, or other work, for that matter, it must be seen in its actual physical configuration, and not in a photo, or on a computer, iPad, or cell phone screen; the so-called new social media “art gallery”. The real actual size, media, materials, configuration etc., is what brings her art works to life. When we approach a work, we already start our experience, and engagement.

Detail of "The Golden Circle" by Anne Hughes

Detail of “The Golden Circle” by Anne Hughes

As we move closer, our experience, and perception start to change, transform through the interaction of the colors, images, materials, and what we personally bring to the work.

Detail of "The Golden Circle" by Anne Hughes

Detail of “The Golden Circle” by Anne Hughes

Then, when we stop in front of Anne’s work, and journey visually through all the materials and imagery, we begin to see and experience the magical tour that Anne is taking us on.

Detail of "The Golden Circle" by Anne Hughes

Detail of “The Golden Circle” by Anne Hughes

We, as the viewer, have to find the correct distance or position from the work so our personal experience can take place. Even moving to the right or left of her work changes what we see and experience. In some art works this happened by default. In Anne’s work the changes in perception is by design.

Detail of "The Golden Circle" by Anne Hughes

Detail of “The Golden Circle” by Anne Hughes

Looking at her work on a computer or other technical device, for that matter, will NEVER give the true impact or power of the work. The character of the materials used ie. paper, wood, canvas, cardboard etc., the colors added, the strokes of the brush, pencil, pastels, etc., interacting with each other, all bring the work to life, transforming the original material(s) into a new identity opening the mind of the viewer giving new insights into ones perception and reality.

Detail of "The Golden Circle" by Anne Hughes

Detail of “The Golden Circle” by Anne Hughes

The phrase “seeing is believing” is very true after seeing the creative work of Anne Hughes; believing takes on a new meaning. As with all art we have to approach it with an open mind. We have to leave our prejudices, and biases at home, as much as possible, and experience each work on it’s own terms and merit /relationship as if we were talking to, or engaged with the artist personally; and before we know it we have developed a new friendship that will last a lifetime.

"Wish List" by Anne Hughes

“Wish List” by Anne Hughes

Those that are fortunate to see Anne Hughes’ work will experience things, like they never have before. But it must be remembered like all relationships, it takes time, engagement, and nurturing. However, even if one does not have the time to develop a “real friendship” or relationship with Anne’s work, just simply passing in front of a work, one just begins to feel as if Anne is stretching out her hand in a welcoming, friendly gesture encouraging us to engage in the exhilarating experience with her art.

Anne Hughes' "Iceland Inspired" 11 3/8" x 11 3/8", soft pastel

Anne Hughes’ “Iceland Inspired” 11 3/8″ x 11 3/8″, soft pastel

So welcome all to the creative world, and transformative experience of the unique art of Anne Hughes, and be pleasantly surprised, and elated with the message transformed by the media; and for all the above, Anne Hughes deserves to be recognized and acknowledged in a category among the best, and most creative artists.

Wolfgang Krol, Associate Professor, Studio Arts (retired)

Concordia University, Montreal, Que., Canada

Fumiko Toda and Beverly Zawitkoski: Exhibitions of Individual Contemporary Painting

ZIA Gallery launches the new art season on Saturday, September 10th with two featured exhibitions by celebrated artists Fumiko Toda and Beverly Zawitkoski.

Fumiko Toda's "Mountain with Wings" and "Untitled"

Fumiko Toda’s “Mountain with Wings” and “Untitled”

 

Beverly Zawitkoski's (left to right) "Watery Haze," "Into the New," and "Now and Then"

Beverly Zawitkoski’s (left to right) “Watery Haze,” “Into the New,” and “Now and Then”

Fumiko Toda, based in New York, grew up in a rural area outside Kyoto, Japan where nature stirred her imagination.

Fumiko Toda's "Golden Path" 48" x 48" mixed media on panel

Fumiko Toda’s “Golden Path” 48″ x 48″ mixed media on panel

As she went on to study art both in Japan and New York, abstract and, often whimsical, imagery of the natural world entered her visual vocabulary and continues to animate her vibrant, joyful expression.

"Always" by Fumiko Toda, 56" x 56" mixed media on satin

“Always” by Fumiko Toda, 56″ x 56″ mixed media on satin

Toda loves to mix and explore different materials and techniques, stitching together elements of her etchings to fabric and paper on panel with her free handling of paint. This exhibition is certain to uplift.

"Planting Seeds" by Fumiko Toda, mixed media on canvas

“Planting Seeds” by Fumiko Toda, mixed media on canvas

Beverly Zawitkoski is based in Montreal, Québec where her BFA from Concordia University led to an award of a Commonwealth Scholarship at The Slade School of Fine Arts in London, UK. There she completed her post-graduate studies and was awarded the Leslye Hurry Prize.

Beverly Zawitkoski's (from left to right) "Through There" 8.75 x 8.75, Acrylic on Mylar and  "Reminiscent" 31.5 x 43.5, Acrylic on Mylar

Beverly Zawitkoski’s (from left to right) “Through There” 8.75 x 8.75, Acrylic on Mylar and “Reminiscent” 31.5 x 43.5, Acrylic on Mylar

Zawitkoski paints with a desire to reach emotional depth and touch a sublime, inexplicable essence. Her journey is intuitive being informed by how the layering of paint changes direction and leads the artist into unpredictable worlds.

"Watery Haze" 24 x 36, Acrylic on Mylar by Beverly Zawitkoski

“Watery Haze” 24 x 36, Acrylic on Mylar by Beverly Zawitkoski

Her abstractions do, in fact, suggest a land, place, figure or world where intangible nature reigns.

"Splendour" by Beverly Zawitkoski 31.5 x 44.5, acrylic on Mylar

“Splendour” by Beverly Zawitkoski 31.5 x 44.5, acrylic on Mylar

Zawitkoski’s works have the ability to speak to people on many levels. Such is, perhaps, their wide appeal. Admirers and new audiences will enjoy seeing the evolution of her bodies of work, as this new exhibition demonstrates, once again.

Fumiko Toda and Beverly Zawitkoski at ZIA Gallery, September 10 - October 8, 2016

Fumiko Toda and Beverly Zawitkoski at ZIA Gallery, September 10 – October 8, 2016

The exhibition opens Saturday, September 10th, 5 – 7 pm at ZIA Gallery, 548 Chestnut Street, Winnetka, IL 60093 All are welcome to attend. Fumiko Toda and Beverly Zawitkoski continues through October 8th, 2016. www.ZIAgallery.net

The Inventive Expression of Jacqueline Baerwald by Shannon Gallagher

Jacqueline Baerwald describes herself mostly as a painter, but her body of work encompasses a variety of genres, including mixed media, assemblage, and sculpture. Her current work combines painting, found objects, and poetry.

Jacqueline Baerwald's "Give Them Wings" Acrylic on Books

Jacqueline Baerwald’s “Give Them Wings” Acrylic on Books

The ‘My Melondy: Issues of Adolescence’ series is conceptual, featuring the recurring image of a young girl painted on stacks of found books. The books, which are entirely thrifted, found, or gifted from friends, are carefully curated and arranged so that the titles form a found poem, which ultimately becomes an integral part of the piece.

Jacqueline Baerwald's "What Little Girls Are Made Of" 48.5 x 48.5 x 3 Acrylic on Books

Jacqueline Baerwald’s “What Little Girls Are Made Of” 48.5 x 48.5 x 3 Acrylic on Books

The work explores the issues faced by young women today, including body image, abuse, and the effects of family dissolution. “The work isn’t based on my life as much as a handful of close girlfriends who experienced rather massive trauma in their lives. The darker paintings of the Melondy series, well… I can attach a name or several names to each one of them,” she explained.

"Now I Lay Me Down To Sleep" Acrylic on Books by Jacqueline Baerwald

“Now I Lay Me Down To Sleep” Acrylic on Books by Jacqueline Baerwald

“Melondy is this sort of cartoonish character I created. I started painting her in 2011, and for a long time, I really only associated her with the average teenage girl… I only personally related to her here and there,” she said. “It’s strange, because I used to feel very different from her, but now I’m realizing that she embodies a lot about myself.”

"All That Glitters" Acrylic on Books by Jacqueline Baerwald

“All That Glitters” Acrylic on Books by Jacqueline Baerwald

Baerwald has enjoyed seeing how viewers relate to the work. “The work reflects a lot of pain,” she said, “but also hope- the idea that this isn’t the end of it.” I don’t know how comfortable I am with the word ‘activist,’ but the work is meant to instigate some sort of change. I don’t want to tell the viewer what that change is, but instead inspire them; to start a thinking process in their minds. I want art to be beautiful and interesting in technique, but also to make me stop and think about life, other people’s lives, the impact I have, and what I can do to make this world a better place, even in my small sphere of influence. At the core, that is what I’m trying to do with the ‘Melondy’ series.”

"Rock, Paper..." Acrylic on Books by Jacqueline Baerwald

“Rock, Paper…” Acrylic on Books by Jacqueline Baerwald

Prior to this series, the artist had been painting in a more realistic manner. “I want children and young people to enjoy the work as much as adults. This is the first time I’d tried something more cartoon-like, more whimsical. It’s been an interesting detour to go down this road, and [the work] seems to resonate with a lot of people,” she said. “The concept and symbolism- the ideas that I am going to convey through the imagery come first.

"You Are My Sunshine" Acrylic on Books by Jacqueline Baerwald

“You Are My Sunshine” Acrylic on Books by Jacqueline Baerwald

The work uses this cute little character that people fall in love with to address issues that they don’t want to talk about. But she draws you in, and you want to love her, and you think about how she’s experiencing a lot of pain, and decide, ‘Let’s stop brushing this under the rug.’”

"Birds of a Feather" Acrylic on books by Jacqueline Baerwald

“Birds of a Feather” Acrylic on books by Jacqueline Baerwald

Baerwald has no shortage of concepts for new work. “I have a long log of ideas. If I had more time, I’d paint all of them. I do a lot of reading on all sorts of subjects, and I have a huge interest in the human condition. I end up reading a lot of things that have scientific or religious components to them, looking at different worldviews, various societal issues and mindsets. Ultimately,” she said, “my work distills more about what is going on in the active mind, how we can monitor our own thinking, and how our actions follow.”

"Sealed Lips" Acrylic on books by Jacqueline Baerwald

“Sealed Lips” Acrylic on books by Jacqueline Baerwald

Jacqueline Baerwald’s work currently can be seen at ZIA Gallery.

In the Midst of January, Art Transports

Now that the holiday season is over, come enjoy an afternoon of art and refreshments on Saturday, January 16, 1-5pm at ZIA Gallery. Allow yourself to be sensually, emotionally and intellectually transported.

A variety of ever-changing art at ZIA Gallery.

A variety of ever-changing art at ZIA Gallery.

2016 begins with an ever-changing exhibition including works by all 25 gallery and thirteen invited artists of varying disciplines and styles.

"Shoreline" is one of Beverly Zawitkoski's new acrylic paintings on mylar.

“Shoreline” is one of Beverly Zawitkoski’s new acrylic paintings on mylar.

New paintings by Beverly Zawitkoski and photographs by John Vlahakis have been added.

John Vlahakis' "Night Noir" is one of his latest photographs.

John Vlahakis’ “Night Noir” is one of his latest photographs.

Lisa A. Frank's "These I Sing In Spring," digital photography

Lisa A. Frank’s “These I Sing In Spring,” digital photography

As admirers carry away artworks, more works arrive, ready to be discovered.  A stunning garden of delight by Lisa A. Frank goes out the door and an equally intriguing photograph comes on view.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Many visitors will be disappointed that one Mary Burke they were considering has found its home.

Mary Burke's 48" x 48"  "Uplift" on right. Original works on paper on left.

Mary Burke’s 48″ x 48″ “Uplift” on right. Original works on paper on left.

Therefore, take note, follow through with the others being circled before those, too, are gone.

The remarkable Tim Liddy who is busy with a steady stream of important commissions, has left us three power-works of trompe l’oeil, sculptural painting.

"circa 1966" is one of Tim Liddy's trompe l'oeil paintings on formed copper.

“circa 1966” is one of Tim Liddy’s trompe l’oeil paintings on formed copper.

His star continues to rise, and we congratulate him on his accomplishments.

Melissa Jay Craig’s tiny handmade paper and steel wire sculptures are disappearing fast.

Melissa Jay Craig's "Luminal (Stage Two)" miniature sculptures.

Melissa Jay Craig’s “Luminal (Stage Two)” miniature sculptures.

Their color and amusing forms stimulate the imagination, as do her other works inspired by cellular patterns of plant forms. Melissa’s (S) Edition made the best of 2015 top ten choices by My Modern Met. Instead of just seeing the work all over the online-world (the book-arts works have gone viral and re-blogged with commentary in many languages throughout the world), you can see them in actuality…remember that? Actual vs. virtual?  From plant to pulp to molded, cast and dyed sculptural form, these artworks are handmade by Melissa to go in a real space. Dare to make your space special with unique expression.

Top: Melissa Jay Craig's hand made paper forms based on cellular patterns of cut-through of stems. Below: Lisa A. Frank's stunning digital photograph "Feared Loved"

Top: Melissa Jay Craig’s hand made paper forms based on cellular patterns of cut-through of stems. Below: Lisa A. Frank’s stunning digital photograph “Feared Loved”

Master of diverse photographic processes, Ted Preuss continues to sensitively explore still life, nature and the female figure. New to the gallery is photographer Kimberly Schneider displaying intimate, romantic black and whites of nature. ZIA Gallery is pleased to announce that artist Michael Cutlip has decided to continue sharing some of his remarkable mixed media paintings and collage with the Chicago public while other works head to L.A. Jonathan Ricci has a variety of his colorful paintings, both large and small, on paper, stretched and un-stretched canvas, along with his distinctive ceramic birds. …And there are many other gallery artists’ works on display showing the eclectic processes and expressions embraced by the gallery and its artists.

Gallery artist Kathy Weaver with her gouache on paper.

Gallery artist Kathy Weaver with her gouache on paper.

The exhibition also includes thirteen invited artists.

Ceramicist: Jacqui Worden (Her bowls reflect a threesome: functional, beautiful and affordable.)

Earrings by Diana Ferguson and Ceramic Vase by Jacqui Worden.

Earrings by Diana Ferguson and Ceramic Vase by Jacqui Worden.

Chicago Fashion Designer: Alice Berry  (She’s back! And her lovely scarves and silk-screened shawls are just the ticket to spark up a winter’s day.)

Designer Alice Berry with her signature scarves and shawls.

Designer Alice Berry with her signature scarves and shawls.

Chicago muralist Anne Farley Gaines contributes an imaginative screen.

Two sided screen by Anne Farley Gaines. Opposite side not shown. See it in the gallery.

Two sided screen by Anne Farley Gaines. Opposite side not shown. See it in the gallery.

Expressionist painter Bill Klatte adds his personal flair.

Giclées by Mark McMahon (expressing city life and sports with high quality, signed reproductions.)

Jewelers: Diana Ferguson, Terry Ross, Amy Taylor and Lisa Williams -each with her own personal vision. Definitely, here is something special for every taste.

A variety of small works by Jeweler Amy Taylor, Ceramic bowls and vases by Jacqui Worden, original works on paper by Mary Burke, necklace by Diana Ferguson, Ceramic birds by Jonathan Ricci.

A variety of small works by Jeweler Amy Taylor, Ceramic bowls and vases by Jacqui Worden, original works on paper by Mary Burke, necklace by Diana Ferguson, Ceramic birds by Jonathan Ricci.

Muralist and Street Artist: Joseph “Sentrock” Perez (What a joy to meet this personable street artist with a touching and inspirational message. Don’t miss!)

Joseph Perez (Sentrock) 's work on paper "Peace Squad"

Joseph Perez (Sentrock) ‘s work on paper “Peace Squad”

Diane Rakocy in front of one of her paintings.

Diane Rakocy in front of one of her paintings.

Painter: Diane Rakocy (She brings her love of color and paint to put the vibrancy in Chicago.)

Photographer: Barry Cain captures the unexpected meeting of two lions and an enjoyment of the natural world.

Barry Cain with his photograph of lions. Ted Preuss' small figure photograph below.

Barry Cain with his photograph of lions. Ted Preuss’ small figure photograph below.

Printmaker: Michael Bond conjures mood and light through drypoint, aquatint and “etching.”

Michael Bond's "Rainy Day Michigan Ave" Drypoint and aquatint.

Michael Bond’s “Rainy Day Michigan Ave” Drypoint and aquatint.

So much to see and appreciate in this confluence of varied genres by talented artists. The exhibition is now in progress and runs through January 30th Tuesday – Saturday 10-5pm at ZIA Gallery, 548 Chestnut St. Winnetka, IL.

ZIA Gallery

ZIA Gallery

Of Marvel And Mystery: The Art of Anne Hughes

HughesMigrations36x24x1PastelAndCutandTornPaper

“Migrations” 36x24x6 Pastel on cut or torn paper © Anne Hughes

By Shannon Gallagher

Anne Hughes’ artwork embodies a sense of marvel and mystery. The viewer is left awestruck by her imaginative 2d and 3d works, which use a rich color palette and employ a variety of mark-making techniques. Hughes describes the process of working on a piece of art as meditative. “That’s what I feel when I’m absorbed in my work. I get lost in the act and watching it evolve. I lose all sense of time,” she said. “I never want to be pinned into one way of working,” she went on. “I like the idea of being able to break so-called rules, that it is possible to resolve difficulties and make something work. Challenge is enjoyable. If, in the end, I achieve a sense of wonder and mystery, of being surprised, then I am happy.”

"Plato's Cave" 52 x 30 x 6 pastel and cut paper ©Anne Hughes

“Plato’s Cave” 52 x 30 x 6 pastel and cut paper ©Anne Hughes

Much of her art revolves around ideas of nature, ecosystems, wonder, and the element of surprise. “We think we’re in control. We aren’t. Life and nature are so complex,” she said. From both an environmental and global point of view, the artist is greatly inspired by variety, diversity, and interconnectedness. “As humans, we don’t necessarily know how we effect the next person and the world, but connections are everywhere.”

"Formations 2" 5 x 5.5 pastel and sequin © Anne Hughes

“Formations 2” 5 x 5.5 pastel and sequin © Anne Hughes

The artist, who has traveled throughout the United States, Canada, Europe, Indonesia and Iceland, is unsure as to whether her travels influence her art or her art makes her more inclined to roam.

"Red Formations" 7 x 7 pastel ©Anne Hughes

“Red Formations” 7 x 7 pastel ©Anne Hughes

“To me, it’s both. I don’t know what comes first, because they go hand in hand. I like being exposed to new environments, learning about different cultures.” She enjoys educational travel, and isn’t one to lie on a beach soaking up the sun. “That’s boring to me,” she said. “I’d rather walk along the beach, be in the water, and observe the environment- that’s what I find fascinating.” When asked where she would like to travel to next, Hughes laughed and said, “I’m not so choosy. I try to take advantage of whatever opportunities come my way.” She would love to visit the Sequoia National Park in California. “I saw redwood trees in Muir Woods in California, and they’re amazing. It’s just stunning. The hush of the park -so peaceful- and the fragrance, unforgettable!”

"L'Opéra" 49 x 42 x 4 Oil on Panel and Wood ©Anne Hughes

“L’Opéra” 49 x 42 x 4 Oil on Panel and Wood ©Anne Hughes

This vested interest in the world originated from Hughes’ childhood. She considers herself lucky to have been able to grow up outdoors, in all seasons, exploring the woods near her house and playing games with friends.

"The Garden" 24 5/8 x 17 3/8 Pastel ©Anne Hughes

“The Garden” 24 5/8 x 17 3/8 Pastel ©Anne Hughes

“I have always valued play. A lot of teenagers are eager to leave play behind. That is unfortunate. Valuing play is where the sense of wonder comes from in my art. I’m curious, and curiosity feeds my work.” Hughes was the type of student that really enjoyed school, every subject from literature to history, government and philosophy. She found that art was a way to tie all of her interests together. “Anything can be a direct or indirect inspirational source.”

"Mutable Sphere" 25 7/8 x 18 1/8 Pastel © Anne Hughes

“Mutable Sphere” 25 7/8 x 18 1/8 Pastel © Anne Hughes

Hughes’ work can be described as dreamlike, and she works on an intuitive wavelength. “I might start with a kernel of an idea or image, but I don’t know where I’m going to end up. I like to break out and let process take over,” she said. Working in this manner has allowed her to surprise herself and enjoy the journey of making a piece of art.

"Pull of the Moon" 30" x 23 7/8 Pastel © Anne Hughes

“Pull of the Moon” 30″ x 23 7/8 Pastel © Anne Hughes

“But working intuitively doesn’t mean that you avoid making choices or being critical. At the beginning, I allow myself more freedom. I don’t make hard and fast decisions too quickly to avoid stymieing myself.” Often, while working, she will begin to see little connections, which lead to a heightened consciousness of what the work is about. “Sometimes a title will pop into my head. When that happens, I know I’m not far from the end,” she explained. Once Hughes is beyond that point, she begins to eliminate weak areas and emphasize strengths in the work. When she does not have any particular image in mind, she sets out to simply make marks. “You just start putting color down,” she said, “and see where it leads.”

"Molotov Cocktail" 54 x 34 x 4 Oil on Panel, graphite on wood © Anne Hughes

“Molotov Cocktail” 54 x 34 x 4 Oil on Panel, graphite on wood © Anne Hughes

She gravitates towards painting on panel, because she can re-work things in ways that would be impossible to do on stretched canvas. “I rub it off, scratch into it. If I’m working with pastels on paper, I apply color, wipe it away, then add more. I attack the surface.”

"Yo-Yo" 12" x 12" Oil on Panel © Anne Hughes

“Yo-Yo” 12″ x 12″ Oil on Panel © Anne Hughes

The artist uses abstraction, realism, and stylization, sometimes all within the same piece. When painting, she uses brushes, rags, and her fingers to apply or remove paint. Several years ago, her dentist gave her some dental tools to use when sculpting with clay, but Hughes has taken to using them in painting, somewhat like a printmaker would use an etching needle- she will go into the surface of the paint with the fine point, draw into the paint, or scratch it away. As for the type of paint she uses, Hughes tends to stick to oils. Acrylics dry much more quickly, and can change color once they do so. “I’ve been more of a purist lately with oils,” she said. “I like to be able to have some working time, so that I can wipe away paint, work thinly, and add layers.”

"Dance" 6 7/8 x 6 7/8 Pastel © Anne Hughes

“Dance” 6 7/8 x 6 7/8 Pastel © Anne Hughes

When drawing with pastels, she prefers to use a small-tooth paper to avoid the texture of the paper becoming a dominant feature of the work. “I prefer to control it, to create texture rather than allow the paper to determine it,” she explained.

Installation view of some of Anne Hughes' work, currently on exhibit at ZIA|Gallery through April 18, 2015

Installation view of some of Anne Hughes’ work, currently on exhibit at ZIA|Gallery through April 18, 2015

Hughes has a surplus of ideas to work through within her artwork, so many that she could never delve into them all during her lifetime- although many of the thoughts she explores become recurring themes throughout her body of work. Having a unique artistic style allows the viewer to immediately identify the work as hers, while also unifying the collective grouping. “Once you’ve touched your core and you have a certain confidence in what you are doing,” she said, “that’s what starts to determine your individual style.”

Anne Hughes’ work is currently on display at ZIA Gallery.