Lisa A. Frank: ‘One Long Conversation’

By Shannon Gallagher

© Lisa A. Frank Feared Loved 40x40 Digital Photography

© Lisa A. Frank, Feared Loved, Digital Photography

Lisa Frank, whose intricate, layered digital photo collages combine her passions for the environment, the outdoors, and photography, began her art career in a different vein. At the young age of 22, after completing her degree in Art Education at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, Frank moved to New York City and pursued a career as a working artist. First, she worked as a scenic painter for theater and opera, later moving on to more decorative, surface paintings for high-end restaurants and other hospitality venues, as well as wallpaper and textile design. “In 1988, there was a stock market crash. People started spending less money on decorative painting, which tends to be a luxury item. At that point, I saw the need to retrain myself, because digital imaging was quickly overtaking the need for hand-rendered design,” she said. Frank attended the School of Visual Arts in NYC and took courses in Photoshop. She bought a camera and a scanner and taught herself how to use them.

© Lisa A. Frank Wildnight Digital Photography

© Lisa A. Frank, Wildnight, Digital Photography

“Everything I do basically comes down to drawing and painting,” she said, “but throughout the decades, the context and scale have changed. Technology has changed; my interests have changed, as has what I am physically able to do. Working in theater is very physically demanding. If I was doing that now, I’d be able to do nothing else.” She described her evolution as an artist as “one long conversation.”

© Lisa A. Frank Specimen with Eucalyptus Turtle Shell Honeycomb Digital Photograph

© Lisa A. Frank, Specimen with Eucalyptus Turtle Shell Honeycomb, Digital Photography

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Upon the completion of her undergraduate degree, Frank moved to NYC for an internship at Juilliard followed by graduate school at the Yale School of Drama . “I stayed on the east coast for 25 years, and then decided that I wanted to be closer to my family. I have nieces and nephews that I really love. My sister’s family is here [in Madison], as are my parents. My brother’s family is in Chicago.”

© Lisa A. Frank Mushroom Diorama Digital Photography

© Lisa A. Frank, Mushroom Diorama, Digital Photography

In terms of how she began to work photographically, Frank adopted a German Shorthair Pointer puppy 14 years ago. “He had a tremendous reserve of energy, and in order to live with him, I had to spend a lot of time outdoors. It is fun because I love the outdoors which is good for both of us. He has been a very patient photographer’s companion,” she said. Although spring and fall are her favorite times of the year, she takes photos in the woods during all four seasons. Several of her works feature patterns comprised of images of icicles. “I don’t go out when it’s below 10 degrees,” she said, “but all other times, I go out with my dogs. I don’t stop taking photos.”

© Lisa A. Frank Spiderwort and Prairie Smoke Digital Photography

© Lisa A. Frank, Spiderwort and Prairie Smoke, Digital Photography

The artist, who spends countless hours exploring nature and taking photographs, visits several places for inspiration. “In Wisconsin, there’s a national trail that has similar status as the Appalachian and Pacific Crest Trails. Segments of the trails are nearby, and I go there regularly. The Nature Conservancy owns some truly wonderful wilderness areas within an hour from Madison. I also go to an arboretum and conservation park close to my home.” The artist listed Olbrich Botanical Gardens as another favorite spot. “Wherever I go, I take my camera as a course of habit. Lately, I’ve also been going to a lot of zoos, because I’m beginning to use more animals in my work.”

Lisa A. Frank These I Sing In Spring Digital Photography

© Lisa A. Frank, These I Sing In Spring, Digital Photography

When asked to describe what she finds frustrating about the artistic process, Frank listed technical problems. “It mostly has to do with printing, color management and having enough memory space for the work that I do. My work is very layered, complicated, and large, so in order to do versions, which I do, it takes up an incredible amount of memory. I’m always up against this task to create enough space for it, backing everything up, and protecting myself adequately,” she said. Frank also has an archive of over 30,000 photographs which can be difficult to organize. “The taking of the photos and the actual making of the work is something that I love and it feels like a truly authentic part of me,” she said. “Organization and getting it to the point of putting it out in the world is where it can get problematic.”

 

Conversely, the most rewarding part of the artistic process for Frank is when people tell her something in her work resonates with them. “Also, I love being able to bring attention to things that many people cannot or do not see.” For instance, Frank often finds herself in the woods, closely examining the environment. “I take photos of mushrooms, moss, and rocks,” she said. “Not everyone is able to go out and explore like that, so I am very happy that I can use those objects as subject matter and show people that they exist.”

© Lisa A. Frank Jack-In-the-Pulpit Berries with Bolete Digital Photography

© Lisa A. Frank, Jack-In-the-Pulpit Berries with Bolete, Digital Photography

Last summer, Frank was accepted to and attended a prestigious residency at the MacDowell Colony, located in New Hampshire. The residency is over 100 years old, and has been host to some very successful artists, writers, musicians, filmmakers, and architects. “It was intimidating to be on the same property as some of these people,” she admitted. Frank went there with the intention of working on a specific project that she proposed during the application process. “I had a wonderful studio in the woods,” she said. “I worked and hiked and took a lot of pictures.”

© Lisa A. Frank Farmers Market Madison WI Digital Photography

© Lisa A. Frank, Farmer’s Market Madison WI, Digital Photography

There were about 25 people in residency – writers, architects, artists, etc. We had communal dinners after which everyone took turns giving presentations.” The goal of the residency is to give creative people an opportunity to work on their projects in a way that is undisturbed. “It’s beautiful there, and the solitude is quietly enforced. At noon, they deliver picnic baskets so that you don’t have to take a break to find something to eat. It was wonderful, just an incredible opportunity,” she said. Frank also takes pride in having been an instructor at the Penland School of Craft in North Carolina. “In a similar kind of way, it was a wonderful chance to really focus on one thing,” she said.

© Lisa A. Frank In My True Love's Hands Digital Photography

© Lisa A. Frank, In My True Love’s Hands, Digital Photography

As far as future plans and projects go, Frank is working on several interdisciplinary projects that include virtual reality content. In addition, this summer she will be teaching a course about exploring nature through technology at Peters Valley in New Jersey.

Lisa Frank’s work is currently on exhibit at ZIA Gallery. See http://www.ziagallery.net/frank.html for more information.

Of Marvel And Mystery: The Art of Anne Hughes

HughesMigrations36x24x1PastelAndCutandTornPaper

“Migrations” 36x24x6 Pastel on cut or torn paper © Anne Hughes

By Shannon Gallagher

Anne Hughes’ artwork embodies a sense of marvel and mystery. The viewer is left awestruck by her imaginative 2d and 3d works, which use a rich color palette and employ a variety of mark-making techniques. Hughes describes the process of working on a piece of art as meditative. “That’s what I feel when I’m absorbed in my work. I get lost in the act and watching it evolve. I lose all sense of time,” she said. “I never want to be pinned into one way of working,” she went on. “I like the idea of being able to break so-called rules, that it is possible to resolve difficulties and make something work. Challenge is enjoyable. If, in the end, I achieve a sense of wonder and mystery, of being surprised, then I am happy.”

"Plato's Cave" 52 x 30 x 6 pastel and cut paper ©Anne Hughes

“Plato’s Cave” 52 x 30 x 6 pastel and cut paper ©Anne Hughes

Much of her art revolves around ideas of nature, ecosystems, wonder, and the element of surprise. “We think we’re in control. We aren’t. Life and nature are so complex,” she said. From both an environmental and global point of view, the artist is greatly inspired by variety, diversity, and interconnectedness. “As humans, we don’t necessarily know how we effect the next person and the world, but connections are everywhere.”

"Formations 2" 5 x 5.5 pastel and sequin © Anne Hughes

“Formations 2″ 5 x 5.5 pastel and sequin © Anne Hughes

The artist, who has traveled throughout the United States, Canada, Europe, Indonesia and Iceland, is unsure as to whether her travels influence her art or her art makes her more inclined to roam.

"Red Formations" 7 x 7 pastel ©Anne Hughes

“Red Formations” 7 x 7 pastel ©Anne Hughes

“To me, it’s both. I don’t know what comes first, because they go hand in hand. I like being exposed to new environments, learning about different cultures.” She enjoys educational travel, and isn’t one to lie on a beach soaking up the sun. “That’s boring to me,” she said. “I’d rather walk along the beach, be in the water, and observe the environment- that’s what I find fascinating.” When asked where she would like to travel to next, Hughes laughed and said, “I’m not so choosy. I try to take advantage of whatever opportunities come my way.” She would love to visit the Sequoia National Park in California. “I saw redwood trees in Muir Woods in California, and they’re amazing. It’s just stunning. The hush of the park -so peaceful- and the fragrance, unforgettable!”

"L'Opéra" 49 x 42 x 4 Oil on Panel and Wood ©Anne Hughes

“L’Opéra” 49 x 42 x 4 Oil on Panel and Wood ©Anne Hughes

This vested interest in the world originated from Hughes’ childhood. She considers herself lucky to have been able to grow up outdoors, in all seasons, exploring the woods near her house and playing games with friends.

"The Garden" 24 5/8 x 17 3/8 Pastel ©Anne Hughes

“The Garden” 24 5/8 x 17 3/8 Pastel ©Anne Hughes

“I have always valued play. A lot of teenagers are eager to leave play behind. That is unfortunate. Valuing play is where the sense of wonder comes from in my art. I’m curious, and curiosity feeds my work.” Hughes was the type of student that really enjoyed school, every subject from literature to history, government and philosophy. She found that art was a way to tie all of her interests together. “Anything can be a direct or indirect inspirational source.”

"Mutable Sphere" 25 7/8 x 18 1/8 Pastel © Anne Hughes

“Mutable Sphere” 25 7/8 x 18 1/8 Pastel © Anne Hughes

Hughes’ work can be described as dreamlike, and she works on an intuitive wavelength. “I might start with a kernel of an idea or image, but I don’t know where I’m going to end up. I like to break out and let process take over,” she said. Working in this manner has allowed her to surprise herself and enjoy the journey of making a piece of art.

"Pull of the Moon" 30" x 23 7/8 Pastel © Anne Hughes

“Pull of the Moon” 30″ x 23 7/8 Pastel © Anne Hughes

“But working intuitively doesn’t mean that you avoid making choices or being critical. At the beginning, I allow myself more freedom. I don’t make hard and fast decisions too quickly to avoid stymieing myself.” Often, while working, she will begin to see little connections, which lead to a heightened consciousness of what the work is about. “Sometimes a title will pop into my head. When that happens, I know I’m not far from the end,” she explained. Once Hughes is beyond that point, she begins to eliminate weak areas and emphasize strengths in the work. When she does not have any particular image in mind, she sets out to simply make marks. “You just start putting color down,” she said, “and see where it leads.”

"Molotov Cocktail" 54 x 34 x 4 Oil on Panel, graphite on wood © Anne Hughes

“Molotov Cocktail” 54 x 34 x 4 Oil on Panel, graphite on wood © Anne Hughes

She gravitates towards painting on panel, because she can re-work things in ways that would be impossible to do on stretched canvas. “I rub it off, scratch into it. If I’m working with pastels on paper, I apply color, wipe it away, then add more. I attack the surface.”

"Yo-Yo" 12" x 12" Oil on Panel © Anne Hughes

“Yo-Yo” 12″ x 12″ Oil on Panel © Anne Hughes

The artist uses abstraction, realism, and stylization, sometimes all within the same piece. When painting, she uses brushes, rags, and her fingers to apply or remove paint. Several years ago, her dentist gave her some dental tools to use when sculpting with clay, but Hughes has taken to using them in painting, somewhat like a printmaker would use an etching needle- she will go into the surface of the paint with the fine point, draw into the paint, or scratch it away. As for the type of paint she uses, Hughes tends to stick to oils. Acrylics dry much more quickly, and can change color once they do so. “I’ve been more of a purist lately with oils,” she said. “I like to be able to have some working time, so that I can wipe away paint, work thinly, and add layers.”

"Dance" 6 7/8 x 6 7/8 Pastel © Anne Hughes

“Dance” 6 7/8 x 6 7/8 Pastel © Anne Hughes

When drawing with pastels, she prefers to use a small-tooth paper to avoid the texture of the paper becoming a dominant feature of the work. “I prefer to control it, to create texture rather than allow the paper to determine it,” she explained.

Installation view of some of Anne Hughes' work, currently on exhibit at ZIA|Gallery through April 18, 2015

Installation view of some of Anne Hughes’ work, currently on exhibit at ZIA|Gallery through April 18, 2015

Hughes has a surplus of ideas to work through within her artwork, so many that she could never delve into them all during her lifetime- although many of the thoughts she explores become recurring themes throughout her body of work. Having a unique artistic style allows the viewer to immediately identify the work as hers, while also unifying the collective grouping. “Once you’ve touched your core and you have a certain confidence in what you are doing,” she said, “that’s what starts to determine your individual style.”

Anne Hughes’ work is currently on display at ZIA Gallery.

News, Tidbits And Ruminations

Welcome to our blog.  I guess we are now the 63,912,719 blog in our known universe.  It’s always exciting to provide another venue of communication regarding our gallery and the art world we serve.  Art Matters.  It always did and always will.  We are passionate about the artists we represent because we too are artists in our own right.  A couple of tidbits: our Gallery Manager is a well known award winning artist.  Anne Hughes who you may have had the privilege of meeting is quite the accomplished artist.  If you have not met her, then please do stop in to do so, and see the other fabulous artists ZIA|Gallery represents. The Director of the gallery, John Vlahakis, is an accomplished fine art photographer, and his exhibition will be coming up at the end of January 2012.

We’re excited about our next show which focuses on two accomplished artists.  Photographer Julie Meridian and Painter Beverly Zawitkoski.  Julie is from Evanston, IL and Beverly is from Montreal, Canada.  Sample images of their work grace the header of our blog site.  ZIA|Gallery will sponsor an opening night exhibition of their work on November 4th from 5 to 7:30 PM.  Our opening night receptions are legendary.  We offer a catered wine event that is open to the public.  We hope you will join us for a salon evening of wine and discourse.

One of the services the gallery offers, something I may point out is not offered by other fine galleries, is our ability to provide custom framing for your art work.  We provide a range of framing services from simple to museum quality.  Please do check us out, especially during our upcoming sale on framing.  Contact the gallery for more information.  Thank you for stopping by, we hope to hear from you in the near future.

Photo Credit: John Vlahakis