Complementary Exhibitions of Mary Burke’s new paintings and Clyde Butcher’s B+W Photography

Mary Burke with her paintings "Garden Shapes" and "Organic Rhythms"

Mary Burke with her paintings “Garden Shapes” and “Organic Rhythms”

The art season has begun with Art Expo and gallery openings. The latest event at ZIA Gallery introduces Mary Burke’s new paintings, fresh and vibrant abstractions with references to the physicality of paint and the endless rich variations of marks and gestures.

"Limestone Layer" by Mary Burke, 60 x 40 Acrylic

“Limestone Layer” by Mary Burke, 60 x 40 Acrylic

Mary says of her work, “Formally, my work manifests the play of design elements which are created through a combination of accidental and intentional marks. I love the paint to entertain me, and then I respond. I work expressively with line, intermingling non-figurative, gestural marks with those that reference plants and flowers.”

"Floral Deconstruct" by Mary Burke, Acrylic and Ink on Panel, 24 x 18

“Floral Deconstruct” by Mary Burke, Acrylic and Ink on Panel, 24 x 18

Inherent in her work is a fascination with nature’s complexities. She loves to experiment branching off with her painterly explorations in a variety of directions, expanding her vocabulary of forms and color.

"Mingled Patterns" 60 x 48, acrylic on canvas by Mary Burke

“Mingled Patterns” 60 x 48, acrylic on canvas by Mary Burke

At the core, however, is her recognizable self-expression. Chicago native Mary Burke now makes her studio in the woods of southwest Michigan.

Clyde Butcher at ZIA Gallery

Clyde Butcher on view at ZIA Gallery through October 7, 2017

The National Parks inform the complementary exhibition of black and white, mostly, silver gelatin photographs by renowned artist Clyde Butcher. The exhibition shows his passion for nature and the richness of the land.

Clyde Butcher's "Horseshoe Bend 3"

Clyde Butcher’s “Horseshoe Bend 3”

Clyde has captured the very essence of rewards offered by our unique park system. His images serve as ambassadors making the case on behalf of these landscapes themselves.

"Buffalo" by Clyde Butcher

“Buffalo” by Clyde Butcher

Fifty years in the making, this collection of sensitive photographs helps to celebrate our national heritage and the places that tell the story of who we are and who we hope to be in perpetuity.

"Foggy Forest 1" by Clyde Butcher

“Foggy Forest 1” by Clyde Butcher

Clyde has chosen to compile a remarkable body of black and white, mostly, silver gelatin prints to celebrate the 100th anniversary of our National Parks. ZIA Gallery is pleased to introduce to lovers of nature and fine photography of the Chicago area, this stunning tribute.

 "Many Glacier 1" by Clyde Butcher 22 x 22

“Many Glacier 1” by Clyde Butcher 22 x 22

At the time of the exhibition opening Clyde Butcher was hunkered down to stave off the forces of Hurricane Irma. Thankfully, all are well and cleanup is in progress. Over the years Clyde Butcher has become known for his efforts in bringing forth the wonders of the Everglades and the importance of their preservation.

Clyde Butcher's "Little Butternut Key" 37 x 51 Silver Gelatin

Clyde Butcher’s “Little Butternut Key” 37 x 51 Silver Gelatin

Award-winning filmmaker Ken Burns states, “Clyde Butcher’s remarkable photographs give us an access to nature we rarely see or experience. They not only reveal the intimate and majestic beauty of nature, but they also remind us of the abiding kinship we mortals share when we work together to preserve these magnificent places. Butcher’s art is a national treasure.”

Clyde Butcher's "Saguaro 1 Arizona" 26 x 30 Silver Gelatin

Clyde Butcher’s “Saguaro 1 Arizona” 26 x 30 Silver Gelatin

The exhibitions continue at ZIA Gallery through October 7th, 548 Chestnut St., Winnetka, IL 60093

www.ZIAgallery.net

Clyde Butcher's "HawaIi Falls"

Clyde Butcher’s “HawaIi Falls”

Photographer Kimberly Schneider’s Haunting Depictions of Nature by Shannon Gallagher

New York City-based photographer Kimberly Schneider’s abstract landscapes are haunting depictions of nature left untouched by man. The desolate land and seascapes, frequently shot with infrared film, somehow transplant complex feelings of peace, stillness, melancholy, and the endurance of time into the viewer’s mind.

"Undercurrent" by Kimberly Schneider

“Undercurrent” by Kimberly Schneider

The work, for Schneider, is essentially a form of self-portraiture. She immerses herself in the environments she aims to document and employs meticulous hours in the darkroom perfecting the images. The artist connects deeply with Point Lobos State Natural Reserve and the coastal California town of Carmel, (where famed photographer Edward Weston lived and worked), and feels compelled to create as a result of her time there.

"Wave Study" by Kimberly Schneider

“Wave Study” by Kimberly Schneider

“I haven’t connected to anything the way I have with Carmel,” she said. “Since my first photography class, before I even knew that I was a landscape photographer, the plan was always to go to Carmel and make work. It all began when I took a trip to San Francisco. A friend of mine hooked me up with a stay in the Weston cabin, which was completely unexpected, and turned out to be everything I could possibly dream of. I had seen the cabin in photographs; and when I got there, I watched my dreams come to life. I just felt that I was always meant to shoot there,” she said.

"Point Lobos" by Kimberly Schneider

“Point Lobos” by Kimberly Schneider

Schneider went on to explain that much of the work is instinctual, and she tends to discover the subconscious aspects of her art while developing the images in her studio. “I shoot what I’m inspired by, but I’m not overthinking it.” When she begins to print the images, she discovers that the level of connectivity to her own life is obvious. “As I work, I realize how tied I am to my photos; there is no separation between my work and my life,” she said. “It’s sort of a zen thing. I just go with it.”

"Memory 2" by Kimberly Schneider

“Memory 2” by Kimberly Schneider

Living in New York provides the network necessary to pursue art as a career, but leaves Schneider longing for a place to escape the hurried nature of the city. “The goal is to be bi-coastal,” she said. “I’ve lived in California. I can’t be there full time, I need a big city… but I want to shoot in California. I have Pacific withdrawal right now,” she went on.

"Entanglement" by Kimberly Schneider

“Entanglement” by Kimberly Schneider

When she needs to get away from the city, but doesn’t have time to get to the West coast, Schneider visits the Brooklyn Botanical Garden, or takes the train to the Upper East Side. “I have a friend that lives by the edge of the water. There’s a walking bridge right on the water, and I’ll shoot and have fun, but I don’t take it as seriously, and I don’t often wind up printing the images. It doesn’t compare to California. I love the eroded feel of the rocks and terrain out West. It’s been a long time since I’ve been highly inspired locally. I cannot have a camera in my hand and not shoot, but in order to invest in printing something, I must feel connected to it,” she said.

Installation view of exhibition at ZIA Gallery

Installation view of exhibition at ZIA Gallery

The artist works from a custom-built, fully functional home darkroom that fits five 16×20 steel trays. “I live in New York, so it’s a very tight space. It can be challenging at times, but it works… and it’s necessary to have it at home,” she said. To get in the flow of creation, Schneider listens to loud music while working, including blues and jazz. “I’ve been listening to a lot of Judith Hill,” she continued. “I discovered her by accident, but she makes awesome printing music.”

"Whisper" by Kimberly Schneider

“Whisper” by Kimberly Schneider



As for what Schneider has planned for the future, her goals are to stay productive, continue making work, and to go back to California with a large format 4×5 camera. A photographer friend of Schneider’s gifted her a Graflex Crown Graphic that had been converted to a field camera, which she plans to use it on her next trip out West. “I’m not sure if it’ll be the end-all-be-all, because eventually I will want to use lenses that are too heavy for it, but I’m planning on making some new work with that,” she explained excitedly. “The more I print this work, the more I realize that it’s time to go large format. The next phase of this series needs the amount of detail that only a large format negative can provide. I am preparing to return to California to start the third phase of my ongoing body of work, which I hope will be the strongest I’ve made thus far,” she said.

Kimberly Schneider and some of her infrared photography

Kimberly Schneider and some of her infrared photography

Kimberly Schneider and Clyde Butcher are currently exhibiting at ZIA Gallery through June 18th, 2016. The gallery is open Tuesday – Saturday, 10 – 5 pm and by appointment.